Career: Atomically-Engineered Complex Oxides And Their Heterostructures For Novel Electronic Functionalities

Project Details

Description

****Non-technical abstract**** The objective of this CAREER award is to combine research efforts to investigate novel functionalities in atomic-scale-engineered complex-oxides going beyond the limitations of conventional semiconductors with education and outreach programs to train a new generation of scientists and engineers in the areas of materials physics and nanoscience. One of the promising material systems for post-silicon nanoelectronics is complex-oxides. Complex oxides exhibit a wide range of functionalities such as high critical temperature superconductivity, (anti)ferromagnetism, and ferroelectricity that do not exist in conventional semiconductors. Moreover, entirely new functionalities can be created when different complex oxides are combined into a heterostructure. This project will investigate emergent functionalities hidden in this new materials family, utilizing a newly developed atomic-layer engineering technique. In order to bring the excitement of these research activities to a broader community and train a new generation of scientists and engineers, a number of education and outreach programs will be developed aimed at K-12 and university students. Hands-on demonstration modules for middle-school students will be developed for the mobile Rutgers Science Explorer program. Pre- and in-service high-school teachers will learn research methods in the lab and develop teaching modules for high-school students reflecting their experience in a materials physics research lab. Graduates and undergraduates, especially from underrepresented groups, will be actively involved in the main research activities and outreach programs. ****Technical Abstract**** The research component of this CAREER project will create and investigate a number of novel complex oxides and their heterostructures anticipated to show previously nonexistent functionalities and properties such as: highly-tunable high-mobility d-band 2DEGs, new multiferroics, and artificial high-temperature superconductors, utilizing a newly developed complex-oxide atomic-layer MBE. These studies will deepen understanding of electron-electron correlation effects in 2D d-band electrons, interfacial coupling mechanisms between magnetism and ferroelectricity, and the effect of atomic-scale control parameters such as modulation doping on superconducting properties of artificial high-temperature superconductors, and pave the way to a new age of complex-oxide nanoelectronics. In order to bring the excitement of these research activities to a broader community and train a new generation of scientists and engineers, a number of education and outreach programs will be developed aimed at K-12 and university students. Hands-on demonstration modules for middle-school students will be developed for the mobile Rutgers Science Explorer program. Pre- and in-service high-school teachers will learn research methods in the lab and develop teaching modules for high-school students reflecting their experience in a materials physics research lab. Graduates and undergraduates, especially from underrepresented groups, will be actively involved in the main research activities and outreach programs.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date6/1/095/31/12

Funding

  • National Science Foundation (NSF)

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