Career: Charge And Energy Transport In Highly Ordered Small-Molecule Organic Semiconductors

Project Details

Description

****NON-TECHNICAL ABSTRACT**** This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). This Faculty Early Career Award supports an integrated educational and research program addressing the fundamental electrical and optical properties of high-purity organic semiconductor devices, such as organic transistors and solar cells. These devices are the building blocks of Organic Electronics, an emergent field that promises cheaper, flexible, greener electronics, and for which the underlying physics has yet to be well developed. In the course of this program intrinsic correlations between the crystal structure and electrical properties (e.g., conductivity) of high-purity organic semiconductors will be elucidated. Optical properties, such as the dynamics of excitons (bound electron-hole pairs), of these materials related to solar cell technology will be investigated. This program will therefore result in a fundamental understanding of charge and exciton motion and their dependence on the molecular/crystal structure of organic semiconductors, thus contributing to an elementary understanding of organic electronics and photovoltaics. The educational component of this project is inherently integrated with research involving novel semiconductor materials and devices. In addition to employing new pedagogical methods for teaching undergraduate and graduate courses, the following innovations will be instituted: (a) a new curriculum in semiconductor physics with an emphasis on organic electronics, (b) special curriculum modules for high school teachers created in collaboration with the Department of Science Pedagogy at Rutgers University to introduce future scientists to the exciting field of modern semiconductor technology, and (c) a web-based interactive tutorial on relevant semiconductor technologies will be created. ****TECHNICAL ABSTRACT**** This award is funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5). This Faculty Early Career Award supports an integrated educational and research program that addresses the fundamentals of intrinsic (not limited by static disorder) polaronic and excitonic transport in small-molecule organic semiconductors. High-quality molecular single crystals used in this project will provide new opportunities for fundamental condensed-matter physics research. The exploration of the dynamical behavior of polarons and excitons in these systems is aided by the clear advantage of high structural order, compared to polycrystalline and amorphous organic films. Investigation of charge and energy transport in these materials is critical to illuminate the basic physics of organic semiconductors and to introduce organic electronics into the University curricula. The main conceptual thrusts of the project are: 1) Investigation of novel transport regimes and electron correlations in organic semiconductors at high carrier densities; 2) Measurements of the exciton diffusion length in highly ordered molecular crystals; 3) Exploration of the intrinsic polaron mobility in organic lattices with different molecular packing; and 4) Understanding the effects of disorder and charge trapping on charge carrier and exciton transport. The educational component of this project will include; (a) the development of a web-based interactive tutorial on Experimental Techniques in Semiconductor Research; (b) the development of an innovative graduate curriculum on Semiconductor Physics; and (c) the design of special curriculum modules for high school teachers that will help to illustrate the exciting modern semiconductor science and technology in high school classrooms.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/098/31/14

Funding

  • National Science Foundation (NSF)

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