Integrating Teaching, Research And Extension In The Supply Chain Of The Lentil Industry

Description

This proposed international research, education and extension collaboration between Rutgers University and the University of Peradeniya in Sri Lanka seeks to 1.) teach Rutgers agricultural economics students about the commodity chain of pulses functions in both the U.S. and Sri Lanka and how to develop a marketing plan; 2.) increase U.S.-grown lentils exports to Sri Lanka; 3.) disseminate information to stakeholders associated with the U.S. lentil industry about novel student-developed marketing plans they can use to increase lentil exports to Sri Lanka; 4.) develop long-term research and educational collaborations between Rutgers faculty and students and those from the University of Peradeniya; and 5.) provide University of Peradeniya students with an overview of current trends in value chain analysis, marketing plan development, entrepreneurship, competitive intelligence, food safety, and traceability. Export of U.S.-grown lentils to Sri Lanka was chosen as the focal point for this proposed project since recent research and data indicate that there exists a greater potential for expanding lentil exports to this country market in the South Asia due to the increasing income and greater preference for lentils. Although U.S. lentil growers have increased their share of the Sri Lankan market (valued at $52M in 2007), they have not fully exploited it. Given this potential export opportunity, this project aims to understand the value chain and develop appropriate marketing strategies that are crucial in achieving a competitive edge in the Sri Lankan market.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date9/1/148/31/19

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)

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lentils
supply chain
Sri Lanka
industry
marketing
students
markets
educational research
marketing strategies
entrepreneurship
agricultural economics
South Asia
traceability
college students
products and commodities
stakeholders
food safety
growers
income
legumes