INVESTIGATIONS INTO A NEW INVASIVE SPECIES, HALYOMORPHA HALYS (STAL) (HEMIPTERA: PENTATOMIDAE), A POTENTIAL THREAT TO NEW JERSEY AGRICULTURE

Project Details

Description

Halyomorpha halys (St?l) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), an introduced species from Asia, has the potential to become a major pest in ornamentals and is a pest in tree fruit in the Mid-Atlantic in the United States. Halyomorpha halys has a wide host range including tree fruit, vegetables, and ornamental plants. In its native habitat, H. halys causes crop loss due to stippling, catfacing and bruising of plants and transmits a plant pathogen responsible for Paulownia Witches Broom. Overwintering adults emerge in early spring and is believed to complete one generation per year in the Northeastern United States. The extent of its spread and host range in the United States is known; however its range continues to expand. At the current time it is present in California, Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. Studying the spread of this insect, it's DNA and potential control methods will lead to a better understanding of how H. halys behaves in its new habitat. Successful completion of this project will help New Jersey farmers and in other parts of the country to produce commodities that safe for consumption, allow them to better compete in varied markets while preserving our natural resources and environment.Description
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/1012/31/14

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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