Project Details

Description

The use of chronological age in clinical practice and in aging research is based on the
premise that biological aging proceeds at an identical pace for all human beings. Such
an approach overlooks the pnncipals of biological diversity. The central hypothesis of
this project is that telomere length, as expressed in white blood cells, provides an
account additional to chronological age, of variation in vascular aging among human
beings. This hypothesis will be tested in the Offspring Study cohort of the Framingham
Heart Study. The project will also seek through genome-wide search for genetic regions
with large effects on telomere length. The specific aims of this project are: 1. To
examine the relations between telomere length and indices of arterial aging in the
previously phenotyped/genotyped Offspring Study cohort of the Framingham Heart
Study. The indices of arterial aging include: brachial pulse pressure, central pulse
pressure, augmentation index, and carotid-femoral, carotid-radial and carotid-brachial
pulse wave velocities; 2. To assess heritability of telomere length and identify genetic
loci that explain variation in telomere length. Results would lead to a better
understanding of the heterogeneity of vascular aging, test the concept that telomere
length may serve as an index of biological aging, and provide information on genetic
determinants of telomere length in human beings.Description
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date6/1/035/31/09

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $331,555.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $354,141.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $317,680.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $335,789.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $345,818.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

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