WORKSHOP: Prisoner Reentry and Reintegration: Improving Data Collection and Methodology to Advance Theory and Knowledge

Project Details

Description

This workshop about prisoner reentry will bring together invited participants from academic institutions, policy organizations, and government to present original research and share knowledge about relevant theoretical perspectives, best practices for the generation of high quality data, and innovative methodologies. The United States experienced a lengthy period of unprecedented prison population growth, and as a consequence substantial numbers of formerly incarcerated individuals are reentering society. These individuals have a broad range of needs such as finding employment, securing housing and reuniting with family members. In order to foster successful reintegration and enhance public safety, the workshop will document cutting edge research findings and highlight mechanisms for bridging research and policy.

The specific objectives of the workshop are to advance research, policy and practice by convening leading and emerging scholars and practitioners at the Rutgers University School of Criminal Justice. The workshop will help researchers make the best use of their resources, avoid methodological and practical pitfalls, and produce the highest-quality and most rigorous empirical research on the topic of prisoner reentry. Advancing research on reentry will have extensive impacts beyond academic circles. A more thorough understanding of the components of successful desistance, rehabilitation and reentry can inform public policy, which could assist millions of formerly-incarcerated individuals, enhance public safety, and enable criminal justice practitioners and policy makers to make effective and efficient use of scarce resources.

StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/158/31/20

Funding

  • National Science Foundation: $48,753.00

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