A biased competition theory for the developmental cognitive neuroscience of visuo-spatial attention

Na Yeon Kim, Sabine Kastner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Selective attention is crucial for navigating natural visual environments, which are often crowded with too many objects to process simultaneously. Research over the past few decades has led to influential theories describing neural mechanisms underlying selective attention in the adult brain. However, how children come to achieve adult-level selective attention functions has been explored much less. Here, we discuss specifically the existing literature on visuo-spatial attention development based on a theoretical framework that is grounded in biased competition theory, while integrating more recent evidence from neuroimaging and electrophysiology. In this forward-looking review, we emphasize that selective attention functions operate through interactions between the developing sensory cortices and fronto-parietal control network. Our framework may prove useful in probing selective attention functions in typical and atypical development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-228
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume29
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

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Parietal Lobe
Electrophysiology
Neuroimaging
Cognitive Neuroscience
Brain
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Selective attention is crucial for navigating natural visual environments, which are often crowded with too many objects to process simultaneously. Research over the past few decades has led to influential theories describing neural mechanisms underlying selective attention in the adult brain. However, how children come to achieve adult-level selective attention functions has been explored much less. Here, we discuss specifically the existing literature on visuo-spatial attention development based on a theoretical framework that is grounded in biased competition theory, while integrating more recent evidence from neuroimaging and electrophysiology. In this forward-looking review, we emphasize that selective attention functions operate through interactions between the developing sensory cortices and fronto-parietal control network. Our framework may prove useful in probing selective attention functions in typical and atypical development.",
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A biased competition theory for the developmental cognitive neuroscience of visuo-spatial attention. / Kim, Na Yeon; Kastner, Sabine.

In: Current Opinion in Psychology, Vol. 29, 01.10.2019, p. 219-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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