A reward-based framework of perceived control

Verena Ly, Kainan S. Wang, Jamil Bhanji, Mauricio Delgado

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Perceived control can be broadly defined as the belief in one's ability to exert control over situations or events. It has long been known that perceived control is a major contributor toward mental and physical health as well as a strong predictor of achievements in life. However, one issue that limits a mechanistic understanding of perceived control is the heterogeneity of how the term is defined in models in psychology and neuroscience, and used in experimental settings across a wide spectrum of studies. Here, we propose a framework for studying perceived control by integrating the ideas from traditionally separate work on perceived control. Specifically, we discuss key properties of perceived control from a reward-based framework, including choice opportunity, instrumental contingency, and success/reward rate. We argue that these separate reward-related processes are integral to fostering an enhanced perception of control and influencing an individual's behavior and well-being. We draw on select studies to elucidate how these reward-related elements are implicated separately and collectively in the investigation of perceived control. We highlight the role of dopamine within corticostriatal pathways shared by reward-related processes and perceived control. Finally, through the lens of this reward-based framework of perceived control, we consider the implications of perceived control in clinical deficits and how these insights could help us better understand psychopathology and treatment options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number65
JournalFrontiers in Neuroscience
Volume13
Issue numberFEB
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Reward
Aptitude
Foster Home Care
Neurosciences
Psychopathology
Lenses
Dopamine
Mental Health
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Keywords

  • Choice
  • Controllability
  • Corticostriatal circuit
  • Dopamine
  • Instrumental behavior
  • Perceived control
  • Reward rate
  • Striatum

Cite this

Ly, Verena ; Wang, Kainan S. ; Bhanji, Jamil ; Delgado, Mauricio. / A reward-based framework of perceived control. In: Frontiers in Neuroscience. 2019 ; Vol. 13, No. FEB.
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A reward-based framework of perceived control. / Ly, Verena; Wang, Kainan S.; Bhanji, Jamil; Delgado, Mauricio.

In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, Vol. 13, No. FEB, 65, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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