A successful 3D core-collapse supernova explosion model

David Vartanyan, Adam S. Burrows, David Radice, M. Aaron Skinner, Joshua Dolence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we present the results of our three-dimensional, multigroup, multineutrinospecies radiation/hydrodynamic simulation using the state-of-the-art code FORNAX of the terminal dynamics of the core of a non-rotating 16 M stellar progenitor. The calculation incorporates redistribution by inelastic scattering, a correction for the effect of many-body interactions on the neutrino-nucleon scattering rates, approximate general relativity (including the effects of gravitational redshifts), velocity-dependent frequency advection, and an implementation of initial perturbations in the progenitor core. The model explodes within ~100 ms of bounce (near when the silicon-oxygen interface is accreted through the temporarily stalled shock) and by the end of the simulation (here, ~677 ms after bounce) is accumulating explosion energy at a rate of ~2.5 × 1050 erg s-1. The supernova explodes with an asymmetrical multiplume structure, with one hemisphere predominating. The gravitational mass of the residual proto-neutron star at ~677 ms is ~1.42 M. Even at the end of the simulation, explosion in most of the solid angle is accompanied by some accretion in an annular region at the wasp-like waist of the debris field. The ejecta electron fraction (Ye) is distributed between ~0.48 and ~0.56, with most of the ejecta mass proton-rich. This may have implications for supernova nucleosynthesis, and could have a bearing on the p- and vp-processes and on the site of the first peak of the r-process. The ejecta spatial distributions of both Ye and mass density are predominantly in wide-angle plumes and large-scale structures, but are nevertheless quite patchy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-369
Number of pages19
JournalMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume482
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

ejecta
supernovae
explosions
explosion
scattering
simulation
hemispheres
wasp
advection
nuclear fusion
debris
erg
neutron stars
silicon
plumes
relativity
spatial distribution
inelastic scattering
neutrinos
plume

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Vartanyan, David ; Burrows, Adam S. ; Radice, David ; Aaron Skinner, M. ; Dolence, Joshua. / A successful 3D core-collapse supernova explosion model. In: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 2019 ; Vol. 482, No. 1. pp. 351-369.
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A successful 3D core-collapse supernova explosion model. / Vartanyan, David; Burrows, Adam S.; Radice, David; Aaron Skinner, M.; Dolence, Joshua.

In: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 482, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 351-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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