Advertising Susceptibility and Youth Preference for and Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages: Findings from a National Survey

Nicole Gesualdo, Itzhak Yanovitzky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study investigated variables that may mediate the relationship between advertising susceptibility and adolescent preference for and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), with the goal of informing inoculation-based mitigation approaches grounded in media literacy and messaging resistance. Design: The study utilized data from a nationally representative sample of US adolescents (ages 12–17 years, n = 1,657) from the National Cancer Institute's Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating survey. Main Outcome Measure: Variables of interest were SSB preference and consumption, advertising susceptibility, perceived self-efficacy to make good nutritional choices, perceived SSB consumption by peers, and attitude toward SSBs. Exposure to obesogenic environments was examined as a moderator. Analysis: Direct and mediated associations between advertising susceptibility and SSB preference were estimated through a series of regression and mediation analyses. Results: Advertising susceptibility was a strong predictor of SSB preference (unstandardized B =.29, SE =.026, P <.001), which, in turn, was a strong predictor of consumption (unstandardized B =.10, SE =.01, P <.001), controlling for potential mediators. The only statistically significant mediator of this association was perceived peer consumption (unstandardized B =.38, SE =.08, P <.001), which was stronger for adolescents with higher exposure to obesogenic environments. Conclusions and Implications: This study offers developers of inoculation-based strategies additional insight into levers that could be targeted for building adolescent resistance to advertising effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-22
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of nutrition education and behavior
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Beverages
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Solar System
Self Efficacy
Health Surveys
Surveys and Questionnaires
Eating
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Cite this

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title = "Advertising Susceptibility and Youth Preference for and Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages: Findings from a National Survey",
abstract = "Objective: This study investigated variables that may mediate the relationship between advertising susceptibility and adolescent preference for and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), with the goal of informing inoculation-based mitigation approaches grounded in media literacy and messaging resistance. Design: The study utilized data from a nationally representative sample of US adolescents (ages 12–17 years, n = 1,657) from the National Cancer Institute's Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating survey. Main Outcome Measure: Variables of interest were SSB preference and consumption, advertising susceptibility, perceived self-efficacy to make good nutritional choices, perceived SSB consumption by peers, and attitude toward SSBs. Exposure to obesogenic environments was examined as a moderator. Analysis: Direct and mediated associations between advertising susceptibility and SSB preference were estimated through a series of regression and mediation analyses. Results: Advertising susceptibility was a strong predictor of SSB preference (unstandardized B =.29, SE =.026, P <.001), which, in turn, was a strong predictor of consumption (unstandardized B =.10, SE =.01, P <.001), controlling for potential mediators. The only statistically significant mediator of this association was perceived peer consumption (unstandardized B =.38, SE =.08, P <.001), which was stronger for adolescents with higher exposure to obesogenic environments. Conclusions and Implications: This study offers developers of inoculation-based strategies additional insight into levers that could be targeted for building adolescent resistance to advertising effects.",
author = "Nicole Gesualdo and Itzhak Yanovitzky",
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