Age-related disruptions of circadian rhythm and memory in the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8)

Kevin Pang, Jonathan P. Miller, Ashley Fortress, J. Devin McAuley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Common complaints of the elderly involve impaired cognitive abilities, such as loss of memory and inability to attend. Although much research has been devoted to these cognitive impairments, other factors such as disrupted sleep patterns and increased daytime drowsiness may contribute indirectly to impaired cognitive abilities. Disrupted sleep-wake cycles may be the result of age-related changes to the internal (circadian) clock. In this article, we review recent research on aging and circadian rhythms with a focus on the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) as a model of aging. We explore some of the neurobiological mechanisms that appear to be responsible for our aging clock, and consider implications of this work for age-related changes in cognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-296
Number of pages14
JournalAge
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aptitude
Circadian Rhythm
Sleep
Circadian Clocks
Sleep Stages
Memory Disorders
Research
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Aging

Cite this

Pang, Kevin ; Miller, Jonathan P. ; Fortress, Ashley ; McAuley, J. Devin. / Age-related disruptions of circadian rhythm and memory in the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8). In: Age. 2006 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 283-296.
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Age-related disruptions of circadian rhythm and memory in the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8). / Pang, Kevin; Miller, Jonathan P.; Fortress, Ashley; McAuley, J. Devin.

In: Age, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.09.2006, p. 283-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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