Aligning food-processing policies to promote healthier fat consumption in India

Shauna Downs, Anne Marie Thow, Suparna Ghosh-Jerath, Stephen R. Leeder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

India is undergoing a shift in consumption from traditional foods to processed foods high in sugar, salt and fat. Partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVOs) high in trans-fat are often used in processed foods in India given their low cost and extended shelf life. The World Health Organization has called for the elimination of PHVOs from the global food supply and recommends their replacement with polyunsaturated fat to maximize health benefits. This study examined barriers to replacing industrially produced trans-fat in the Indian food supply and systematically identified potential policy solutions to assist the government in encouraging its removal and replacement with healthier polyunsaturated fat. A combination of food supply chain analysis and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders was conducted. The main barriers faced by the food-processing sector in terms of reducing use of trans-fat and replacing it with healthier oils in India were the low availability and high cost of oils high in polyunsaturated fats leading to a reliance on palm oil (high in saturated fat) and the low use of those healthier oils in product reformulation. Improved integration between farmers and processors, investment in technology and pricing strategies to incentivize use of healthier oils for product reformulation were identified as policy options. Food processors have trouble accessing sufficient affordable healthy oils for product reformulation, but existing incentives aimed at supporting food processing could be tweaked to ensure a greater supply of healthy oils with the potential to improve population health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)595-605
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Promotion International
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nutrition Policy
Food Handling
India
Fats
food
Oils
food supply
Food Supply
vegetables
Food
Plant Oils
Costs and Cost Analysis
costs
health
WHO
Food Chain
pricing
Insurance Benefits
farmer
stakeholder

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Downs, Shauna ; Marie Thow, Anne ; Ghosh-Jerath, Suparna ; Leeder, Stephen R. / Aligning food-processing policies to promote healthier fat consumption in India. In: Health Promotion International. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 595-605.
@article{b9f32cf9cc0348e2bb626020d88e6838,
title = "Aligning food-processing policies to promote healthier fat consumption in India",
abstract = "India is undergoing a shift in consumption from traditional foods to processed foods high in sugar, salt and fat. Partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVOs) high in trans-fat are often used in processed foods in India given their low cost and extended shelf life. The World Health Organization has called for the elimination of PHVOs from the global food supply and recommends their replacement with polyunsaturated fat to maximize health benefits. This study examined barriers to replacing industrially produced trans-fat in the Indian food supply and systematically identified potential policy solutions to assist the government in encouraging its removal and replacement with healthier polyunsaturated fat. A combination of food supply chain analysis and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders was conducted. The main barriers faced by the food-processing sector in terms of reducing use of trans-fat and replacing it with healthier oils in India were the low availability and high cost of oils high in polyunsaturated fats leading to a reliance on palm oil (high in saturated fat) and the low use of those healthier oils in product reformulation. Improved integration between farmers and processors, investment in technology and pricing strategies to incentivize use of healthier oils for product reformulation were identified as policy options. Food processors have trouble accessing sufficient affordable healthy oils for product reformulation, but existing incentives aimed at supporting food processing could be tweaked to ensure a greater supply of healthy oils with the potential to improve population health.",
author = "Shauna Downs and {Marie Thow}, Anne and Suparna Ghosh-Jerath and Leeder, {Stephen R.}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dat094",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "595--605",
journal = "Health Promotion International",
issn = "0957-4824",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "3",

}

Aligning food-processing policies to promote healthier fat consumption in India. / Downs, Shauna; Marie Thow, Anne; Ghosh-Jerath, Suparna; Leeder, Stephen R.

In: Health Promotion International, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 595-605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aligning food-processing policies to promote healthier fat consumption in India

AU - Downs, Shauna

AU - Marie Thow, Anne

AU - Ghosh-Jerath, Suparna

AU - Leeder, Stephen R.

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - India is undergoing a shift in consumption from traditional foods to processed foods high in sugar, salt and fat. Partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVOs) high in trans-fat are often used in processed foods in India given their low cost and extended shelf life. The World Health Organization has called for the elimination of PHVOs from the global food supply and recommends their replacement with polyunsaturated fat to maximize health benefits. This study examined barriers to replacing industrially produced trans-fat in the Indian food supply and systematically identified potential policy solutions to assist the government in encouraging its removal and replacement with healthier polyunsaturated fat. A combination of food supply chain analysis and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders was conducted. The main barriers faced by the food-processing sector in terms of reducing use of trans-fat and replacing it with healthier oils in India were the low availability and high cost of oils high in polyunsaturated fats leading to a reliance on palm oil (high in saturated fat) and the low use of those healthier oils in product reformulation. Improved integration between farmers and processors, investment in technology and pricing strategies to incentivize use of healthier oils for product reformulation were identified as policy options. Food processors have trouble accessing sufficient affordable healthy oils for product reformulation, but existing incentives aimed at supporting food processing could be tweaked to ensure a greater supply of healthy oils with the potential to improve population health.

AB - India is undergoing a shift in consumption from traditional foods to processed foods high in sugar, salt and fat. Partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVOs) high in trans-fat are often used in processed foods in India given their low cost and extended shelf life. The World Health Organization has called for the elimination of PHVOs from the global food supply and recommends their replacement with polyunsaturated fat to maximize health benefits. This study examined barriers to replacing industrially produced trans-fat in the Indian food supply and systematically identified potential policy solutions to assist the government in encouraging its removal and replacement with healthier polyunsaturated fat. A combination of food supply chain analysis and semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders was conducted. The main barriers faced by the food-processing sector in terms of reducing use of trans-fat and replacing it with healthier oils in India were the low availability and high cost of oils high in polyunsaturated fats leading to a reliance on palm oil (high in saturated fat) and the low use of those healthier oils in product reformulation. Improved integration between farmers and processors, investment in technology and pricing strategies to incentivize use of healthier oils for product reformulation were identified as policy options. Food processors have trouble accessing sufficient affordable healthy oils for product reformulation, but existing incentives aimed at supporting food processing could be tweaked to ensure a greater supply of healthy oils with the potential to improve population health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940669374&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940669374&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dat094

DO - https://doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dat094

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 595

EP - 605

JO - Health Promotion International

JF - Health Promotion International

SN - 0957-4824

IS - 3

ER -