An experimental investigation of the application of binegative stereotypes

Christina Dyar, Ashley Lytle, Bonita London, Sheri R. Levy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Binegativity (the stigmatization of bisexuality) is prevalent in the United States and has a detrimental impact on bisexual individuals' sexual identity and mental health. However, little research has experimentally examined binegative stereotyping or how stereotypes influence assumptions about bisexual individuals. The current experimental study examined the application of binegative stereotypes to hypothetical individuals who varied in gender and sexual orientation among 3 samples: a heterosexual undergraduate sample (HUS), a lesbian and gay community sample (LGCS), and a heterosexual community sample (HCS; ns = 772, 500, and 546, respectively). Results indicated that hypothetical bisexual individuals were rated as more likely to be in noncommitted or nonmonogamous relationships in the future and to change their sexual orientation identity than heterosexual and lesbian and gay targets. Results also indicated that the participants' endorsement of stereotypes about the promiscuity of bisexual individuals and the bisexual target's involvement in a current same-sex or different-sex relationship predicted the participant's expectations regarding the bisexual target's future involvement in a committed or noncommitted, same-sex or different-sex relationship. These expectations about the bisexual target's future relationship type, combined with the participant's endorsement of stereotypes about the instability of bisexuality predicted the participants' expectations about the bisexual target's future sexual orientation identity. Implications of these finding are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-327
Number of pages14
JournalPsychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

stereotype
sexual orientation
bisexuality
Heterosexuality
Sexual Behavior
stigmatization
Stereotyping
Bisexuality
community
mental health
Sexual Minorities
gender
Reproductive Health
Mental Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Gender Studies

Cite this

@article{5202c90a9ddb4e6c8deeefc8b904d3c2,
title = "An experimental investigation of the application of binegative stereotypes",
abstract = "Binegativity (the stigmatization of bisexuality) is prevalent in the United States and has a detrimental impact on bisexual individuals' sexual identity and mental health. However, little research has experimentally examined binegative stereotyping or how stereotypes influence assumptions about bisexual individuals. The current experimental study examined the application of binegative stereotypes to hypothetical individuals who varied in gender and sexual orientation among 3 samples: a heterosexual undergraduate sample (HUS), a lesbian and gay community sample (LGCS), and a heterosexual community sample (HCS; ns = 772, 500, and 546, respectively). Results indicated that hypothetical bisexual individuals were rated as more likely to be in noncommitted or nonmonogamous relationships in the future and to change their sexual orientation identity than heterosexual and lesbian and gay targets. Results also indicated that the participants' endorsement of stereotypes about the promiscuity of bisexual individuals and the bisexual target's involvement in a current same-sex or different-sex relationship predicted the participant's expectations regarding the bisexual target's future involvement in a committed or noncommitted, same-sex or different-sex relationship. These expectations about the bisexual target's future relationship type, combined with the participant's endorsement of stereotypes about the instability of bisexuality predicted the participants' expectations about the bisexual target's future sexual orientation identity. Implications of these finding are discussed.",
author = "Christina Dyar and Ashley Lytle and Bonita London and Levy, {Sheri R.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1037/sgd0000234",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "314--327",
journal = "Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity",
issn = "2329-0382",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "3",

}

An experimental investigation of the application of binegative stereotypes. / Dyar, Christina; Lytle, Ashley; London, Bonita; Levy, Sheri R.

In: Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.01.2017, p. 314-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - An experimental investigation of the application of binegative stereotypes

AU - Dyar, Christina

AU - Lytle, Ashley

AU - London, Bonita

AU - Levy, Sheri R.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Binegativity (the stigmatization of bisexuality) is prevalent in the United States and has a detrimental impact on bisexual individuals' sexual identity and mental health. However, little research has experimentally examined binegative stereotyping or how stereotypes influence assumptions about bisexual individuals. The current experimental study examined the application of binegative stereotypes to hypothetical individuals who varied in gender and sexual orientation among 3 samples: a heterosexual undergraduate sample (HUS), a lesbian and gay community sample (LGCS), and a heterosexual community sample (HCS; ns = 772, 500, and 546, respectively). Results indicated that hypothetical bisexual individuals were rated as more likely to be in noncommitted or nonmonogamous relationships in the future and to change their sexual orientation identity than heterosexual and lesbian and gay targets. Results also indicated that the participants' endorsement of stereotypes about the promiscuity of bisexual individuals and the bisexual target's involvement in a current same-sex or different-sex relationship predicted the participant's expectations regarding the bisexual target's future involvement in a committed or noncommitted, same-sex or different-sex relationship. These expectations about the bisexual target's future relationship type, combined with the participant's endorsement of stereotypes about the instability of bisexuality predicted the participants' expectations about the bisexual target's future sexual orientation identity. Implications of these finding are discussed.

AB - Binegativity (the stigmatization of bisexuality) is prevalent in the United States and has a detrimental impact on bisexual individuals' sexual identity and mental health. However, little research has experimentally examined binegative stereotyping or how stereotypes influence assumptions about bisexual individuals. The current experimental study examined the application of binegative stereotypes to hypothetical individuals who varied in gender and sexual orientation among 3 samples: a heterosexual undergraduate sample (HUS), a lesbian and gay community sample (LGCS), and a heterosexual community sample (HCS; ns = 772, 500, and 546, respectively). Results indicated that hypothetical bisexual individuals were rated as more likely to be in noncommitted or nonmonogamous relationships in the future and to change their sexual orientation identity than heterosexual and lesbian and gay targets. Results also indicated that the participants' endorsement of stereotypes about the promiscuity of bisexual individuals and the bisexual target's involvement in a current same-sex or different-sex relationship predicted the participant's expectations regarding the bisexual target's future involvement in a committed or noncommitted, same-sex or different-sex relationship. These expectations about the bisexual target's future relationship type, combined with the participant's endorsement of stereotypes about the instability of bisexuality predicted the participants' expectations about the bisexual target's future sexual orientation identity. Implications of these finding are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040995328&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85040995328&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1037/sgd0000234

DO - https://doi.org/10.1037/sgd0000234

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 314

EP - 327

JO - Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity

JF - Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity

SN - 2329-0382

IS - 3

ER -