Anti-Icing or Deicing

Icephobicities of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Hierarchical Structures

Mohammad Amin Sarshar, Dong Song, Christopher Swarctz, Jongsuk Lee, Chang-Hwan Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Superhydrophobic surfaces have gained tremendous attention for icephobic properties, including anti-icing and deicing. The former is about how much a surface can delay the ice formation, whereas the latter is about how easy the surface can let the ice go off after freezing. In this study, superhydrophobic surfaces with different surface roughnesses and wettabilities were tested for both anti-icing and deicing purposes to investigate their correlation in association with the different surface properties. Anti-icing test was conducted by utilizing an icing wind tunnel to see how much ice gets accumulated on the surfaces in a dynamic condition (i.e., impacting supercooled water droplets by forced wind). For the deicing test, sessile droplets were frozen on the surfaces in a static condition (i.e., no wind) and then the shear adhesion forces were measured to disconnect the frozen ices off from the surfaces. The experimental results show that higher anti-icing efficacy does not necessarily mean higher deicing efficacy because of the different icing mechanisms. Although a superhydrophobic surface with a lower depinning force (or contact angle hysteresis) delays the ice accumulation in a dynamic condition more effectively, the same surface can require higher shear adhesion force for ice grown in a static condition where condensation and wetting state of a droplet are the key factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13821-13827
Number of pages7
JournalLangmuir
Volume34
Issue number46
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2018

Fingerprint

Snow and ice removal
deicing
ice formation
Ice
ice
Wetting
adhesion
Adhesion
shear
wind tunnels
wettability
Freezing
surface properties
freezing
wetting
Contact angle
Wind tunnels
Surface properties
Hysteresis
Condensation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Spectroscopy
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Sarshar, Mohammad Amin ; Song, Dong ; Swarctz, Christopher ; Lee, Jongsuk ; Choi, Chang-Hwan. / Anti-Icing or Deicing : Icephobicities of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Hierarchical Structures. In: Langmuir. 2018 ; Vol. 34, No. 46. pp. 13821-13827.
@article{22b259baf53e45978d226ce359e12840,
title = "Anti-Icing or Deicing: Icephobicities of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Hierarchical Structures",
abstract = "Superhydrophobic surfaces have gained tremendous attention for icephobic properties, including anti-icing and deicing. The former is about how much a surface can delay the ice formation, whereas the latter is about how easy the surface can let the ice go off after freezing. In this study, superhydrophobic surfaces with different surface roughnesses and wettabilities were tested for both anti-icing and deicing purposes to investigate their correlation in association with the different surface properties. Anti-icing test was conducted by utilizing an icing wind tunnel to see how much ice gets accumulated on the surfaces in a dynamic condition (i.e., impacting supercooled water droplets by forced wind). For the deicing test, sessile droplets were frozen on the surfaces in a static condition (i.e., no wind) and then the shear adhesion forces were measured to disconnect the frozen ices off from the surfaces. The experimental results show that higher anti-icing efficacy does not necessarily mean higher deicing efficacy because of the different icing mechanisms. Although a superhydrophobic surface with a lower depinning force (or contact angle hysteresis) delays the ice accumulation in a dynamic condition more effectively, the same surface can require higher shear adhesion force for ice grown in a static condition where condensation and wetting state of a droplet are the key factors.",
author = "Sarshar, {Mohammad Amin} and Dong Song and Christopher Swarctz and Jongsuk Lee and Chang-Hwan Choi",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "20",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b02231",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "13821--13827",
journal = "Langmuir",
issn = "0743-7463",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "46",

}

Anti-Icing or Deicing : Icephobicities of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Hierarchical Structures. / Sarshar, Mohammad Amin; Song, Dong; Swarctz, Christopher; Lee, Jongsuk; Choi, Chang-Hwan.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 34, No. 46, 20.11.2018, p. 13821-13827.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anti-Icing or Deicing

T2 - Icephobicities of Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Hierarchical Structures

AU - Sarshar, Mohammad Amin

AU - Song, Dong

AU - Swarctz, Christopher

AU - Lee, Jongsuk

AU - Choi, Chang-Hwan

PY - 2018/11/20

Y1 - 2018/11/20

N2 - Superhydrophobic surfaces have gained tremendous attention for icephobic properties, including anti-icing and deicing. The former is about how much a surface can delay the ice formation, whereas the latter is about how easy the surface can let the ice go off after freezing. In this study, superhydrophobic surfaces with different surface roughnesses and wettabilities were tested for both anti-icing and deicing purposes to investigate their correlation in association with the different surface properties. Anti-icing test was conducted by utilizing an icing wind tunnel to see how much ice gets accumulated on the surfaces in a dynamic condition (i.e., impacting supercooled water droplets by forced wind). For the deicing test, sessile droplets were frozen on the surfaces in a static condition (i.e., no wind) and then the shear adhesion forces were measured to disconnect the frozen ices off from the surfaces. The experimental results show that higher anti-icing efficacy does not necessarily mean higher deicing efficacy because of the different icing mechanisms. Although a superhydrophobic surface with a lower depinning force (or contact angle hysteresis) delays the ice accumulation in a dynamic condition more effectively, the same surface can require higher shear adhesion force for ice grown in a static condition where condensation and wetting state of a droplet are the key factors.

AB - Superhydrophobic surfaces have gained tremendous attention for icephobic properties, including anti-icing and deicing. The former is about how much a surface can delay the ice formation, whereas the latter is about how easy the surface can let the ice go off after freezing. In this study, superhydrophobic surfaces with different surface roughnesses and wettabilities were tested for both anti-icing and deicing purposes to investigate their correlation in association with the different surface properties. Anti-icing test was conducted by utilizing an icing wind tunnel to see how much ice gets accumulated on the surfaces in a dynamic condition (i.e., impacting supercooled water droplets by forced wind). For the deicing test, sessile droplets were frozen on the surfaces in a static condition (i.e., no wind) and then the shear adhesion forces were measured to disconnect the frozen ices off from the surfaces. The experimental results show that higher anti-icing efficacy does not necessarily mean higher deicing efficacy because of the different icing mechanisms. Although a superhydrophobic surface with a lower depinning force (or contact angle hysteresis) delays the ice accumulation in a dynamic condition more effectively, the same surface can require higher shear adhesion force for ice grown in a static condition where condensation and wetting state of a droplet are the key factors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056466467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056466467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b02231

DO - https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.8b02231

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 13821

EP - 13827

JO - Langmuir

JF - Langmuir

SN - 0743-7463

IS - 46

ER -