Antibiotic resistance profiles among mesophilic aerobic bacteria in Nigerian chicken litter and associated antibiotic resistance genes

Olayeni Stephen Olonitola, Nicole Fahrenfeld, Amy Pruden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of global antibiotic use practices in livestock on the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens is poorly understood. There is a paucity of data among African nations, which suffer from high rates of antibiotic resistant infections among the human population. Escherichia (29.5%), Staphylococcus (15.8%), and Proteus (15.79%) were the dominant bacterial genera isolated from chicken litter from four different farms in Zaria, Nigeria, all of which contain human pathogenic members. Escherichia isolates were uniformly susceptible to augmentin and cefuroxime, but resistant to sulfamethoxazole (54.5%), ampicillin (22.7%), ciprofloxacin (18.2%), cephalothin (13.6%) and gentamicin (13.6%). Staphylococcus isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, but resistant to tetracycline (86.7%), erythromycin (80%), clindamycin (60%), and penicillin (33.3%). Many of the isolates (65.4%) were resistant to multiple antibiotics, with a multiple antibiotic resistance index (MARI) ≥ 0.2. sul1, sul2, and vanA were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates. Chicken litter associated with antibiotic use and farming practices in Nigeria could be a public health concern given that the antibiotic resistant patterns among genera containing pathogens indicate the potential for antibiotic treatment failure. However, the MARI values were generally lower than reported for Escherichia coli from intensive poultry operations in industrial nations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)867-874
Number of pages8
JournalPoultry Science
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2015

Fingerprint

Aerobic Bacteria
Microbial Drug Resistance
Chickens
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Genes
Escherichia
Sulfamethoxazole
Ciprofloxacin
Nigeria
Gentamicins
Staphylococcus
Cephalothin
Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination
Cefuroxime
Proteus
Clindamycin
Livestock
Erythromycin
Ampicillin
Poultry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Keywords

  • MARI
  • Nigeria
  • antibiotic resistance
  • antibiotics
  • chicken

Cite this

@article{2261160c18a241c2b28dab38ec7981fb,
title = "Antibiotic resistance profiles among mesophilic aerobic bacteria in Nigerian chicken litter and associated antibiotic resistance genes",
abstract = "The effect of global antibiotic use practices in livestock on the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens is poorly understood. There is a paucity of data among African nations, which suffer from high rates of antibiotic resistant infections among the human population. Escherichia (29.5{\%}), Staphylococcus (15.8{\%}), and Proteus (15.79{\%}) were the dominant bacterial genera isolated from chicken litter from four different farms in Zaria, Nigeria, all of which contain human pathogenic members. Escherichia isolates were uniformly susceptible to augmentin and cefuroxime, but resistant to sulfamethoxazole (54.5{\%}), ampicillin (22.7{\%}), ciprofloxacin (18.2{\%}), cephalothin (13.6{\%}) and gentamicin (13.6{\%}). Staphylococcus isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, but resistant to tetracycline (86.7{\%}), erythromycin (80{\%}), clindamycin (60{\%}), and penicillin (33.3{\%}). Many of the isolates (65.4{\%}) were resistant to multiple antibiotics, with a multiple antibiotic resistance index (MARI) ≥ 0.2. sul1, sul2, and vanA were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates. Chicken litter associated with antibiotic use and farming practices in Nigeria could be a public health concern given that the antibiotic resistant patterns among genera containing pathogens indicate the potential for antibiotic treatment failure. However, the MARI values were generally lower than reported for Escherichia coli from intensive poultry operations in industrial nations.",
keywords = "MARI, Nigeria, antibiotic resistance, antibiotics, chicken",
author = "Olonitola, {Olayeni Stephen} and Nicole Fahrenfeld and Amy Pruden",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "18",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.3382/ps/pev069",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "867--874",
journal = "Poultry science",
issn = "0032-5791",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

}

Antibiotic resistance profiles among mesophilic aerobic bacteria in Nigerian chicken litter and associated antibiotic resistance genes. / Olonitola, Olayeni Stephen; Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Pruden, Amy.

In: Poultry Science, Vol. 94, No. 5, 18.02.2015, p. 867-874.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Antibiotic resistance profiles among mesophilic aerobic bacteria in Nigerian chicken litter and associated antibiotic resistance genes

AU - Olonitola, Olayeni Stephen

AU - Fahrenfeld, Nicole

AU - Pruden, Amy

PY - 2015/2/18

Y1 - 2015/2/18

N2 - The effect of global antibiotic use practices in livestock on the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens is poorly understood. There is a paucity of data among African nations, which suffer from high rates of antibiotic resistant infections among the human population. Escherichia (29.5%), Staphylococcus (15.8%), and Proteus (15.79%) were the dominant bacterial genera isolated from chicken litter from four different farms in Zaria, Nigeria, all of which contain human pathogenic members. Escherichia isolates were uniformly susceptible to augmentin and cefuroxime, but resistant to sulfamethoxazole (54.5%), ampicillin (22.7%), ciprofloxacin (18.2%), cephalothin (13.6%) and gentamicin (13.6%). Staphylococcus isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, but resistant to tetracycline (86.7%), erythromycin (80%), clindamycin (60%), and penicillin (33.3%). Many of the isolates (65.4%) were resistant to multiple antibiotics, with a multiple antibiotic resistance index (MARI) ≥ 0.2. sul1, sul2, and vanA were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates. Chicken litter associated with antibiotic use and farming practices in Nigeria could be a public health concern given that the antibiotic resistant patterns among genera containing pathogens indicate the potential for antibiotic treatment failure. However, the MARI values were generally lower than reported for Escherichia coli from intensive poultry operations in industrial nations.

AB - The effect of global antibiotic use practices in livestock on the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens is poorly understood. There is a paucity of data among African nations, which suffer from high rates of antibiotic resistant infections among the human population. Escherichia (29.5%), Staphylococcus (15.8%), and Proteus (15.79%) were the dominant bacterial genera isolated from chicken litter from four different farms in Zaria, Nigeria, all of which contain human pathogenic members. Escherichia isolates were uniformly susceptible to augmentin and cefuroxime, but resistant to sulfamethoxazole (54.5%), ampicillin (22.7%), ciprofloxacin (18.2%), cephalothin (13.6%) and gentamicin (13.6%). Staphylococcus isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, but resistant to tetracycline (86.7%), erythromycin (80%), clindamycin (60%), and penicillin (33.3%). Many of the isolates (65.4%) were resistant to multiple antibiotics, with a multiple antibiotic resistance index (MARI) ≥ 0.2. sul1, sul2, and vanA were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates. Chicken litter associated with antibiotic use and farming practices in Nigeria could be a public health concern given that the antibiotic resistant patterns among genera containing pathogens indicate the potential for antibiotic treatment failure. However, the MARI values were generally lower than reported for Escherichia coli from intensive poultry operations in industrial nations.

KW - MARI

KW - Nigeria

KW - antibiotic resistance

KW - antibiotics

KW - chicken

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84929774136&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84929774136&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.3382/ps/pev069

DO - https://doi.org/10.3382/ps/pev069

M3 - Article

VL - 94

SP - 867

EP - 874

JO - Poultry science

JF - Poultry science

SN - 0032-5791

IS - 5

ER -