Appearance of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity as a consequence of mycoplasma contamination

Eric J. Stanbridge, Jay Tischfield, Edward L. Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

MYCOPLASMAS are common contaminants of cells in culture and are often responsible for profound alterations in the metabolism of infected cells 1,2. Such alterations include chromosomal aberrations3,4 and changes in host cell enzyme activities5. We have reported that amniotic fluid cell cultures contaminated with mycoplasmas revealed a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations over those seen in uninfected cultures6. This finding demonstrated that the presence of these organisms in amniotic fluid cell lines poses a potential hazard to prenatal chromosome diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-331
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume256
Issue number5515
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1975
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase
Mycoplasma
Amniotic Fluid
Cell Culture Techniques
Prenatal Diagnosis
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes
Cell Line
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stanbridge, Eric J. ; Tischfield, Jay ; Schneider, Edward L. / Appearance of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity as a consequence of mycoplasma contamination. In: Nature. 1975 ; Vol. 256, No. 5515. pp. 329-331.
@article{e9fdf336abb94e6c99399f78739c1932,
title = "Appearance of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity as a consequence of mycoplasma contamination",
abstract = "MYCOPLASMAS are common contaminants of cells in culture and are often responsible for profound alterations in the metabolism of infected cells 1,2. Such alterations include chromosomal aberrations3,4 and changes in host cell enzyme activities5. We have reported that amniotic fluid cell cultures contaminated with mycoplasmas revealed a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations over those seen in uninfected cultures6. This finding demonstrated that the presence of these organisms in amniotic fluid cell lines poses a potential hazard to prenatal chromosome diagnosis.",
author = "Stanbridge, {Eric J.} and Jay Tischfield and Schneider, {Edward L.}",
year = "1975",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1038/256329a0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "256",
pages = "329--331",
journal = "Nature",
issn = "0028-0836",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "5515",

}

Appearance of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity as a consequence of mycoplasma contamination. / Stanbridge, Eric J.; Tischfield, Jay; Schneider, Edward L.

In: Nature, Vol. 256, No. 5515, 01.12.1975, p. 329-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Appearance of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity as a consequence of mycoplasma contamination

AU - Stanbridge, Eric J.

AU - Tischfield, Jay

AU - Schneider, Edward L.

PY - 1975/12/1

Y1 - 1975/12/1

N2 - MYCOPLASMAS are common contaminants of cells in culture and are often responsible for profound alterations in the metabolism of infected cells 1,2. Such alterations include chromosomal aberrations3,4 and changes in host cell enzyme activities5. We have reported that amniotic fluid cell cultures contaminated with mycoplasmas revealed a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations over those seen in uninfected cultures6. This finding demonstrated that the presence of these organisms in amniotic fluid cell lines poses a potential hazard to prenatal chromosome diagnosis.

AB - MYCOPLASMAS are common contaminants of cells in culture and are often responsible for profound alterations in the metabolism of infected cells 1,2. Such alterations include chromosomal aberrations3,4 and changes in host cell enzyme activities5. We have reported that amniotic fluid cell cultures contaminated with mycoplasmas revealed a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations over those seen in uninfected cultures6. This finding demonstrated that the presence of these organisms in amniotic fluid cell lines poses a potential hazard to prenatal chromosome diagnosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0016709744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0016709744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/256329a0

DO - https://doi.org/10.1038/256329a0

M3 - Article

VL - 256

SP - 329

EP - 331

JO - Nature

JF - Nature

SN - 0028-0836

IS - 5515

ER -