Architectured helically coiled scaffolds from elastomeric poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) copolyester via wet electrospinning

Agueda Sonseca, Rahul Sahay, Karolina Stepien, Julia Bukala, Aleksandra Wcislek, Andrew McClain, Peter Sobolewski, Xiao Meng Sui, Judit E. Puskas, Joachim Kohn, H. Daniel Wagner, Miroslawa El Fray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Electrospinning is one of the most investigated methods used to produce polymeric fiber scaffolds that mimic the morphology of native extracellular matrix. These structures have been extensively studied in the context of scaffolds for tissue regeneration. However, the compactness of materials obtained by traditional electrospinning, collected as two-dimensional non-woven scaffolds, can limit cell infiltration and tissue ingrowth. In addition, for applications in smooth muscle tissue engineering, highly elastic scaffolds capable of withstanding cyclic mechanical strains without suffering significant permanent deformations are preferred. In order to address these challenges, we report the fabrication of microscale 3D helically coiled scaffolds (referred as 3D-HCS) by wet-electrospinning method, a modification of the traditional electrospinning process in which a coagulation bath (non-solvent system for the electrospun material) is used as the collector. The present study, for the first time, successfully demonstrates the feasibility of using this method to produce various architectures of 3D helically coiled scaffolds (HCS) from segmented copolyester of poly (butylene succinate-co-dilinoleic succinate) (PBS-DLS), a thermoplastic elastomer. We examined the role of process parameters and propose a mechanism for the HCS formation. Fabricated 3D-HCS showed high specific surface area, high porosity, and good elasticity. Further, the marked increase in cell proliferation on 3D-HCS confirmed the suitability of these materials as scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number110505
JournalMaterials Science and Engineering C
Volume108
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

Fingerprint

tissue engineering
Electrospinning
butenes
Scaffolds
smooth muscle
void ratio
elastomers
infiltration
coagulation
regeneration
microbalances
accumulators
baths
elastic properties
porosity
fabrication
Scaffolds (biology)
fibers
Tissue engineering
matrices

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)

Keywords

  • Coagulation bath collector
  • Electrospinning
  • Helically coiled architectures
  • Poly(butylene succinate)(PBS)
  • Polyester

Cite this

Sonseca, Agueda ; Sahay, Rahul ; Stepien, Karolina ; Bukala, Julia ; Wcislek, Aleksandra ; McClain, Andrew ; Sobolewski, Peter ; Sui, Xiao Meng ; Puskas, Judit E. ; Kohn, Joachim ; Wagner, H. Daniel ; El Fray, Miroslawa. / Architectured helically coiled scaffolds from elastomeric poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) copolyester via wet electrospinning. In: Materials Science and Engineering C. 2020 ; Vol. 108.
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abstract = "Electrospinning is one of the most investigated methods used to produce polymeric fiber scaffolds that mimic the morphology of native extracellular matrix. These structures have been extensively studied in the context of scaffolds for tissue regeneration. However, the compactness of materials obtained by traditional electrospinning, collected as two-dimensional non-woven scaffolds, can limit cell infiltration and tissue ingrowth. In addition, for applications in smooth muscle tissue engineering, highly elastic scaffolds capable of withstanding cyclic mechanical strains without suffering significant permanent deformations are preferred. In order to address these challenges, we report the fabrication of microscale 3D helically coiled scaffolds (referred as 3D-HCS) by wet-electrospinning method, a modification of the traditional electrospinning process in which a coagulation bath (non-solvent system for the electrospun material) is used as the collector. The present study, for the first time, successfully demonstrates the feasibility of using this method to produce various architectures of 3D helically coiled scaffolds (HCS) from segmented copolyester of poly (butylene succinate-co-dilinoleic succinate) (PBS-DLS), a thermoplastic elastomer. We examined the role of process parameters and propose a mechanism for the HCS formation. Fabricated 3D-HCS showed high specific surface area, high porosity, and good elasticity. Further, the marked increase in cell proliferation on 3D-HCS confirmed the suitability of these materials as scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.",
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author = "Agueda Sonseca and Rahul Sahay and Karolina Stepien and Julia Bukala and Aleksandra Wcislek and Andrew McClain and Peter Sobolewski and Sui, {Xiao Meng} and Puskas, {Judit E.} and Joachim Kohn and Wagner, {H. Daniel} and {El Fray}, Miroslawa",
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Sonseca, A, Sahay, R, Stepien, K, Bukala, J, Wcislek, A, McClain, A, Sobolewski, P, Sui, XM, Puskas, JE, Kohn, J, Wagner, HD & El Fray, M 2020, 'Architectured helically coiled scaffolds from elastomeric poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) copolyester via wet electrospinning', Materials Science and Engineering C, vol. 108, 110505. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2019.110505

Architectured helically coiled scaffolds from elastomeric poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) copolyester via wet electrospinning. / Sonseca, Agueda; Sahay, Rahul; Stepien, Karolina; Bukala, Julia; Wcislek, Aleksandra; McClain, Andrew; Sobolewski, Peter; Sui, Xiao Meng; Puskas, Judit E.; Kohn, Joachim; Wagner, H. Daniel; El Fray, Miroslawa.

In: Materials Science and Engineering C, Vol. 108, 110505, 03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Architectured helically coiled scaffolds from elastomeric poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) copolyester via wet electrospinning

AU - Sonseca, Agueda

AU - Sahay, Rahul

AU - Stepien, Karolina

AU - Bukala, Julia

AU - Wcislek, Aleksandra

AU - McClain, Andrew

AU - Sobolewski, Peter

AU - Sui, Xiao Meng

AU - Puskas, Judit E.

AU - Kohn, Joachim

AU - Wagner, H. Daniel

AU - El Fray, Miroslawa

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - Electrospinning is one of the most investigated methods used to produce polymeric fiber scaffolds that mimic the morphology of native extracellular matrix. These structures have been extensively studied in the context of scaffolds for tissue regeneration. However, the compactness of materials obtained by traditional electrospinning, collected as two-dimensional non-woven scaffolds, can limit cell infiltration and tissue ingrowth. In addition, for applications in smooth muscle tissue engineering, highly elastic scaffolds capable of withstanding cyclic mechanical strains without suffering significant permanent deformations are preferred. In order to address these challenges, we report the fabrication of microscale 3D helically coiled scaffolds (referred as 3D-HCS) by wet-electrospinning method, a modification of the traditional electrospinning process in which a coagulation bath (non-solvent system for the electrospun material) is used as the collector. The present study, for the first time, successfully demonstrates the feasibility of using this method to produce various architectures of 3D helically coiled scaffolds (HCS) from segmented copolyester of poly (butylene succinate-co-dilinoleic succinate) (PBS-DLS), a thermoplastic elastomer. We examined the role of process parameters and propose a mechanism for the HCS formation. Fabricated 3D-HCS showed high specific surface area, high porosity, and good elasticity. Further, the marked increase in cell proliferation on 3D-HCS confirmed the suitability of these materials as scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

AB - Electrospinning is one of the most investigated methods used to produce polymeric fiber scaffolds that mimic the morphology of native extracellular matrix. These structures have been extensively studied in the context of scaffolds for tissue regeneration. However, the compactness of materials obtained by traditional electrospinning, collected as two-dimensional non-woven scaffolds, can limit cell infiltration and tissue ingrowth. In addition, for applications in smooth muscle tissue engineering, highly elastic scaffolds capable of withstanding cyclic mechanical strains without suffering significant permanent deformations are preferred. In order to address these challenges, we report the fabrication of microscale 3D helically coiled scaffolds (referred as 3D-HCS) by wet-electrospinning method, a modification of the traditional electrospinning process in which a coagulation bath (non-solvent system for the electrospun material) is used as the collector. The present study, for the first time, successfully demonstrates the feasibility of using this method to produce various architectures of 3D helically coiled scaffolds (HCS) from segmented copolyester of poly (butylene succinate-co-dilinoleic succinate) (PBS-DLS), a thermoplastic elastomer. We examined the role of process parameters and propose a mechanism for the HCS formation. Fabricated 3D-HCS showed high specific surface area, high porosity, and good elasticity. Further, the marked increase in cell proliferation on 3D-HCS confirmed the suitability of these materials as scaffolds for soft tissue engineering.

KW - Coagulation bath collector

KW - Electrospinning

KW - Helically coiled architectures

KW - Poly(butylene succinate)(PBS)

KW - Polyester

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