Association between increased-risk donor social behaviors and recipient outcomes after heart transplantation

Alexis K. Okoh, Olivia Chan, Molly Schultheis, Mitalie Gupta, Aakash Shah, Justin Gold, Mark J. Russo, Leonard Y. Lee, Margarita Camacho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This study aims to investigate the association between social behaviors of increased-risk donors (IRD) and recipient outcomes after heart transplantation. Methods: The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database was queried to identify patients who received a heart transplant between 2004 and 2015. Patients were grouped based on donor's risk status (IRD vs standard risk donor [SRD]). Recipients of IRD were categorized based on donor social behaviors (SB), and recipient survival was assessed. Cox regression analysis was used to identify associations between SB of donors and recipient survival. Results: Out of 22 333 heart transplantations performed during the study period, 2769 (12%) received an IRD graft with the following SB: Unprofessional tattoos or piercings (n = 1722) (63%), cocaine use (n = 916) (33%), heavy smoking (n = 437) (16%), and heavy alcohol abuse (n = 610) (22%). Viral screens detected 72(3%) hepatitis B virus (HBV) positive and 12 (0.4%) hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive at donation. There was no difference in recipient survival based on both donor risk and their social behaviors. Cox regression analysis found only donor HCV infection and non-identical ABO mismatch to be associated with poor recipient survival among recipients of IR grafts. Conclusion: Cardiac allografts from IRD, serologically negative for viruses, can safely be used. There is no association between social behaviors of IRD and recipient survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13787
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Keywords

  • heart failure
  • heart transplant
  • hepatitis
  • increased-risk donor

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  • Cite this

    Okoh, A. K., Chan, O., Schultheis, M., Gupta, M., Shah, A., Gold, J., Russo, M. J., Lee, L. Y., & Camacho, M. (2020). Association between increased-risk donor social behaviors and recipient outcomes after heart transplantation. Clinical Transplantation, 34(3), [e13787]. https://doi.org/10.1111/ctr.13787