Associations between mindfulness, executive function, social-emotional skills, and quality of life among hispanic children

Chien Chung Huang, Shuang Lu, Juan Rios, Yafan Chen, Marci Stringham, Shannon Cheung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hispanic children constitute the largest ethnic minority in the United States of America, and yet few studies examine the relationship between mindfulness and Hispanic children’s quality of life. This 2018 study seeks to gain insight into how mindfulness is associated with Hispanic children’s quality of life. We surveyed 96 children in 5th- and 6th-grade classes in three Northern New Jersey elementary schools in 2018. Structure Equation Modeling was used to examine the associations between mindfulness, executive function, social-emotional skills, and quality of life. The results indicate that mindfulness is significantly and directly associated with executive function (β= 0.53), and that executive function is positively associated with social-emotional skills (β= 0.54) and quality of life (β= 0.51) of the sampled Hispanic children. The total effects on quality of life are significant for mindfulness (β= 0.33), executive function (β= 0.62), and social-emotional skills (β = 0.20). The findings shed light upon factors that can affect Hispanic children’s quality of life and call for interventions related to these factors in order to improve their well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7796
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Keywords

  • Executive function
  • Hispanic children
  • Mindfulness
  • Quality of life
  • Social-emotional skills

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