Attitude Responsiveness and Partisan Bias

Direct Experience with the Affordable Care Act

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluates the competing influences of motivated reasoning and personal experience on policy preferences toward the Affordable Care Act. Using cross-sectional and panel survey data, the findings reveal that healthcare attitudes are responsive to information that individuals receive through personal experience. Individuals who experienced a positive change in their insurance situation are found to express more positive views toward the health reform law, while individuals who lost their insurance or experienced an otherwise negative personal impact on their insurance situations express more negative views. The results point to personal experience as a source of information that can influence individuals’ preferences. However, although attitudes are responsive to the quality of one’s personal interactions with the healthcare system, the results also suggest that partisan bias is still at work. Republicans are more likely to blame the health reform law for negative changes in their health insurance situations, while Democrats are more likely to credit the law for positive changes in their situations. These motivated attributions for their personal situations temper how responsive partisans’ attitudes are to information acquired through personal experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)861-882
Number of pages22
JournalPolitical Behavior
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Attitude Responsiveness and Partisan Bias : Direct Experience with the Affordable Care Act. / McCabe, Katherine.

In: Political Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 861-882.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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