Bacterial interactions with nanostructured surfaces

Yafei Luan, Sidi Liu, Maria Pihl, Henny C. van der Mei, Jian Liu, Ferdi Hizal, Chang-Hwan Choi, Hong Chen, Yijin Ren, Henk J. Busscher

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Nanostructured surfaces are called “promising” to control bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Initial adhesion is followed by emergence of surface-programmed bacterial properties and biofilm growth. A easy distinction between nanostructured surfaces can be made on basis of periodic- or random-occurrence of nanostructured features, although often nanostructured surfaces are microstructured due to merging of their nanofeatures. Characterization of nanostructured surfaces is not trivial due to the myriad of different nanoscaled morphologies. Both superhydrophobic and hydrophilic, nanostructured surfaces generally yield low bacterial adhesion. On smooth surfaces, bacteria deform when adhering, causing membrane surface tension changes and accompanying responses yielding emergent properties. Adhesion to nanostructured surfaces, causes multiple cell wall deformation sites when bacteria are adhering in valleys, while in case of hill-top adhesion, highly localized cell wall deformation occurs. Accordingly, bacterial adhesion to nanostructured surfaces yields emergent responses that range from pressure-induced EPS production to cell wall rupture and death, based upon which nanostructured surfaces are consistently called “promising” for bacterial adhesion and biofilm control. Other promising features of nanostructured surfaces are increased antibiotic housing, thermal effects and photo-induced ROS production, but the latter two promises are largely based on properties of suspended nanoparticles and may not hold when particles are comprised in nanostructured coatings or materials. Moreover, in order to bring nanostructured coatings and materials to application, experiments are needed that go beyond the current limit of the laboratory bench.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages170-189
Number of pages20
JournalCurrent Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science
Volume38
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

adhesion
Adhesion
interactions
biofilms
Biofilms
Cells
bacteria
Bacteria
coatings
Coatings
antibiotics
Antibiotics
Merging
death
Thermal effects
seats
valleys
Surface tension
temperature effects
interfacial tension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Luan, Y., Liu, S., Pihl, M., van der Mei, H. C., Liu, J., Hizal, F., ... Busscher, H. J. (2018). Bacterial interactions with nanostructured surfaces. Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science, 38, 170-189. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cocis.2018.10.007
Luan, Yafei ; Liu, Sidi ; Pihl, Maria ; van der Mei, Henny C. ; Liu, Jian ; Hizal, Ferdi ; Choi, Chang-Hwan ; Chen, Hong ; Ren, Yijin ; Busscher, Henk J. / Bacterial interactions with nanostructured surfaces. In: Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science. 2018 ; Vol. 38. pp. 170-189.
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Luan, Y, Liu, S, Pihl, M, van der Mei, HC, Liu, J, Hizal, F, Choi, C-H, Chen, H, Ren, Y & Busscher, HJ 2018, 'Bacterial interactions with nanostructured surfaces' Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science, vol. 38, pp. 170-189. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cocis.2018.10.007

Bacterial interactions with nanostructured surfaces. / Luan, Yafei; Liu, Sidi; Pihl, Maria; van der Mei, Henny C.; Liu, Jian; Hizal, Ferdi; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Chen, Hong; Ren, Yijin; Busscher, Henk J.

In: Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science, Vol. 38, 01.11.2018, p. 170-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Liu, Sidi

AU - Pihl, Maria

AU - van der Mei, Henny C.

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AU - Hizal, Ferdi

AU - Choi, Chang-Hwan

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AU - Busscher, Henk J.

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