Behaviors of adult Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera

Buprestidae)

Cesar Rodriguez-Saona, James R. Miller, Therese M. Poland, Tina M. Kuhn, Gard W. Otis, Tanya Turk, Daniel Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 2-year study was conducted in Canada (2003) and the United States (2005) to better understand searching and mating behaviors of adult Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. In both field and laboratory, adults spent more time resting and walking than feeding or flying. The sex ratio in the field was biased towards males, which tended to hover around trees, likely looking for mates. There was more leaf feeding damage within a tree higher in the canopy than in the lower canopy early in the season, but this difference disappeared over time. In choice experiments, males attempted to mate with individuals of both sexes, but they landed more frequently on females than on males. A series of sexual behaviors was observed in the laboratory, including: exposure of the ovipositor/genitalia, sporadic jumping by males, attempted mating, and mating. Sexual behaviors were absent among 1-3 day-old beetles, but were observed regularly in 10-12 day-old beetles. Females were seen exposing their ovipositor, suggestive of pheromone-calling behavior. No courtship was observed prior to mating. Hovering, searching, and landing behaviors suggest that beetles most likely rely on visual cues during mate finding, although host-plant volatiles and/or pheromones might also be involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalGreat Lakes Entomologist
Volume40
Issue number1-2
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Agrilus planipennis
Buprestidae
Coleoptera
beetle
ovipositor
sexual behavior
pheromone
pheromones
canopy
calling behavior
searching behavior
visual cue
mating behavior
jumping
courtship
walking
sex ratio
genitalia
host plant
flight

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Insect Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Rodriguez-Saona, C., Miller, J. R., Poland, T. M., Kuhn, T. M., Otis, G. W., Turk, T., & Ward, D. (2007). Behaviors of adult Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Great Lakes Entomologist, 40(1-2), 1-16.
Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar ; Miller, James R. ; Poland, Therese M. ; Kuhn, Tina M. ; Otis, Gard W. ; Turk, Tanya ; Ward, Daniel. / Behaviors of adult Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera : Buprestidae). In: Great Lakes Entomologist. 2007 ; Vol. 40, No. 1-2. pp. 1-16.
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Rodriguez-Saona, C, Miller, JR, Poland, TM, Kuhn, TM, Otis, GW, Turk, T & Ward, D 2007, 'Behaviors of adult Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)', Great Lakes Entomologist, vol. 40, no. 1-2, pp. 1-16.

Behaviors of adult Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera : Buprestidae). / Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Miller, James R.; Poland, Therese M.; Kuhn, Tina M.; Otis, Gard W.; Turk, Tanya; Ward, Daniel.

In: Great Lakes Entomologist, Vol. 40, No. 1-2, 01.03.2007, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Rodriguez-Saona C, Miller JR, Poland TM, Kuhn TM, Otis GW, Turk T et al. Behaviors of adult Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Great Lakes Entomologist. 2007 Mar 1;40(1-2):1-16.