Biocatalytic hydrogen atom transfer: an invigorating approach to free-radical reactions

Yuji Nakano, Kyle F. Biegasiewicz, Todd K. Hyster

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Initiating and terminating free-radical reactionis via hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) is an attractive means of avoiding substrate prefunctionalization. Small molecule catalysts and reagents, however, struggle to execute this fundamental step with useful levels of diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity. In contrast, nature often carries out HAT with exquisite levels of selectivity for even electronically unactivated carbon–hydrogen bonds. By understanding how enzymes exploit and control this fundamental step, new strategies can be developed to address several long-standing challenges in free-radical reactions. This review will cover recent discoveries in biocatalysis that exploit a HAT mechanism to either initiate or terminate novel one-electron reactions.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages16-24
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Chemical Biology
Volume49
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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Free radical reactions
Free Radicals
Hydrogen
Atoms
Enantioselectivity
Biocatalysis
Hydrogen bonds
Carbon
Catalysts
Molecules
Electrons
Substrates
Enzymes

Cite this

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Biocatalytic hydrogen atom transfer : an invigorating approach to free-radical reactions. / Nakano, Yuji; Biegasiewicz, Kyle F.; Hyster, Todd K.

In: Current Opinion in Chemical Biology, Vol. 49, 01.04.2019, p. 16-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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