Biodegradable Polymers

Zheng Zhang, Ophir Ortiz, Ritu Goyal, Joachim Kohn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The design and development of tissue-engineered products has benefited from many years of clinical utilization of a wide range of biodegradable polymers. Newly developed biodegradable polymers and modifications of previously developed biodegradable polymers have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important tissue-engineering applications. Insights gained from studies of cell-matrix interactions, cell-cell signaling, and organization of cellular components, are placing increased demands on medical implants to interact with the patient's tissue in a more biologically appropriate fashion. Whereas in the twentieth century biocompatibility was largely equated with eliciting no harmful response, the biomaterials of the twenty first century will have to elicit tissue responses that support healing or regeneration of the patient's own tissue.This chapter surveys the universe of those biodegradable polymers that may be useful in the development of medical implants and tissue-engineered products. Here, we distinguish between biologically derived polymers and synthetic polymers. The materials are described in terms of their chemical composition, breakdown products, mechanism of breakdown, mechanical properties, and clinical limitations. Also discussed are product design considerations in processing of biomaterials into a final form (e.g., gel, membrane, matrix) that will effect the desired tissue response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPrinciples of Tissue Engineering
Subtitle of host publicationFourth Edition
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages441-473
Number of pages33
ISBN (Print)9780123983589
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Fingerprint

Biodegradable polymers
Polymers
Tissue
Biocompatible Materials
Cell signaling
Tissue Engineering
Biocompatibility
Product design
Tissue engineering
Cell Communication
Regeneration
Gels
Membranes
Mechanical properties
Processing
Chemical analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Zhang, Z., Ortiz, O., Goyal, R., & Kohn, J. (2013). Biodegradable Polymers. In Principles of Tissue Engineering: Fourth Edition (pp. 441-473). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-398358-9.00023-9
Zhang, Zheng ; Ortiz, Ophir ; Goyal, Ritu ; Kohn, Joachim. / Biodegradable Polymers. Principles of Tissue Engineering: Fourth Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2013. pp. 441-473
@inbook{234b1d5857bc4d4ba6059720cca8d4e7,
title = "Biodegradable Polymers",
abstract = "The design and development of tissue-engineered products has benefited from many years of clinical utilization of a wide range of biodegradable polymers. Newly developed biodegradable polymers and modifications of previously developed biodegradable polymers have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important tissue-engineering applications. Insights gained from studies of cell-matrix interactions, cell-cell signaling, and organization of cellular components, are placing increased demands on medical implants to interact with the patient's tissue in a more biologically appropriate fashion. Whereas in the twentieth century biocompatibility was largely equated with eliciting no harmful response, the biomaterials of the twenty first century will have to elicit tissue responses that support healing or regeneration of the patient's own tissue.This chapter surveys the universe of those biodegradable polymers that may be useful in the development of medical implants and tissue-engineered products. Here, we distinguish between biologically derived polymers and synthetic polymers. The materials are described in terms of their chemical composition, breakdown products, mechanism of breakdown, mechanical properties, and clinical limitations. Also discussed are product design considerations in processing of biomaterials into a final form (e.g., gel, membrane, matrix) that will effect the desired tissue response.",
author = "Zheng Zhang and Ophir Ortiz and Ritu Goyal and Joachim Kohn",
year = "2013",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-398358-9.00023-9",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780123983589",
pages = "441--473",
booktitle = "Principles of Tissue Engineering",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
address = "United States",

}

Zhang, Z, Ortiz, O, Goyal, R & Kohn, J 2013, Biodegradable Polymers. in Principles of Tissue Engineering: Fourth Edition. Elsevier Inc., pp. 441-473. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-398358-9.00023-9

Biodegradable Polymers. / Zhang, Zheng; Ortiz, Ophir; Goyal, Ritu; Kohn, Joachim.

Principles of Tissue Engineering: Fourth Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2013. p. 441-473.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Biodegradable Polymers

AU - Zhang, Zheng

AU - Ortiz, Ophir

AU - Goyal, Ritu

AU - Kohn, Joachim

PY - 2013/11/1

Y1 - 2013/11/1

N2 - The design and development of tissue-engineered products has benefited from many years of clinical utilization of a wide range of biodegradable polymers. Newly developed biodegradable polymers and modifications of previously developed biodegradable polymers have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important tissue-engineering applications. Insights gained from studies of cell-matrix interactions, cell-cell signaling, and organization of cellular components, are placing increased demands on medical implants to interact with the patient's tissue in a more biologically appropriate fashion. Whereas in the twentieth century biocompatibility was largely equated with eliciting no harmful response, the biomaterials of the twenty first century will have to elicit tissue responses that support healing or regeneration of the patient's own tissue.This chapter surveys the universe of those biodegradable polymers that may be useful in the development of medical implants and tissue-engineered products. Here, we distinguish between biologically derived polymers and synthetic polymers. The materials are described in terms of their chemical composition, breakdown products, mechanism of breakdown, mechanical properties, and clinical limitations. Also discussed are product design considerations in processing of biomaterials into a final form (e.g., gel, membrane, matrix) that will effect the desired tissue response.

AB - The design and development of tissue-engineered products has benefited from many years of clinical utilization of a wide range of biodegradable polymers. Newly developed biodegradable polymers and modifications of previously developed biodegradable polymers have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important tissue-engineering applications. Insights gained from studies of cell-matrix interactions, cell-cell signaling, and organization of cellular components, are placing increased demands on medical implants to interact with the patient's tissue in a more biologically appropriate fashion. Whereas in the twentieth century biocompatibility was largely equated with eliciting no harmful response, the biomaterials of the twenty first century will have to elicit tissue responses that support healing or regeneration of the patient's own tissue.This chapter surveys the universe of those biodegradable polymers that may be useful in the development of medical implants and tissue-engineered products. Here, we distinguish between biologically derived polymers and synthetic polymers. The materials are described in terms of their chemical composition, breakdown products, mechanism of breakdown, mechanical properties, and clinical limitations. Also discussed are product design considerations in processing of biomaterials into a final form (e.g., gel, membrane, matrix) that will effect the desired tissue response.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84903230401&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84903230401&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-398358-9.00023-9

DO - https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-398358-9.00023-9

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780123983589

SP - 441

EP - 473

BT - Principles of Tissue Engineering

PB - Elsevier Inc.

ER -

Zhang Z, Ortiz O, Goyal R, Kohn J. Biodegradable Polymers. In Principles of Tissue Engineering: Fourth Edition. Elsevier Inc. 2013. p. 441-473 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-398358-9.00023-9