Boron doped with iron

Preparation and combustion in air

Kerri Lee Chintersingh, Mirko Schoenitz, Edward Dreyzin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Combustion-relevant effects of iron as an additive to boron powders were examined. 95% pure boron powder was doped with iron by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl. Iron concentration was determined using inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. Two doped boron samples with 1.6 and 3.1 wt-% Fe were compared to commercial boron powder for physical morphology and combustion characteristics. No significant morphological differences between the doped and undoped samples were detected by scanning electron microscopy. Elemental maps confirmed uniform distribution of iron in the coated powders. For combustion studies, individual particles of different powders were ignited in air by passing through a CO2 laser beam. Burn times and combustion temperatures were determined from optical emissions of burning particles. Doped boron samples have shorter burn times than particles of the undoped commercial boron powder with the same size. The effect of doping boron with iron on burn times appears to be greater for larger particles. Combustion temperatures depend on the iron content. Lower iron concentrations showed temperatures near 3100 K, comparable to uncoated commercial boron. At higher Fe concentrations, the temperatures decreased to about 2500 K. A reaction mechanism is proposed explaining qualitatively a two-stage reaction pattern observed for the full-fledged combustion of boron; the approach uses a recently published binary B-O phase diagram. This combustion reactions are altered when boron is doped with iron, which is proposed to serve as a catalyst for boron oxidation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-295
Number of pages10
JournalCombustion and Flame
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Boron
boron
Iron
iron
preparation
air
Powders
Air
combustion temperature
Temperature
Spectrometry
Phase diagrams
thermal decomposition
Laser beams
light emission
temperature
Pyrolysis
Doping (additives)
phase diagrams
laser beams

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Fuel Technology

Cite this

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title = "Boron doped with iron: Preparation and combustion in air",
abstract = "Combustion-relevant effects of iron as an additive to boron powders were examined. 95{\%} pure boron powder was doped with iron by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl. Iron concentration was determined using inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. Two doped boron samples with 1.6 and 3.1 wt-{\%} Fe were compared to commercial boron powder for physical morphology and combustion characteristics. No significant morphological differences between the doped and undoped samples were detected by scanning electron microscopy. Elemental maps confirmed uniform distribution of iron in the coated powders. For combustion studies, individual particles of different powders were ignited in air by passing through a CO2 laser beam. Burn times and combustion temperatures were determined from optical emissions of burning particles. Doped boron samples have shorter burn times than particles of the undoped commercial boron powder with the same size. The effect of doping boron with iron on burn times appears to be greater for larger particles. Combustion temperatures depend on the iron content. Lower iron concentrations showed temperatures near 3100 K, comparable to uncoated commercial boron. At higher Fe concentrations, the temperatures decreased to about 2500 K. A reaction mechanism is proposed explaining qualitatively a two-stage reaction pattern observed for the full-fledged combustion of boron; the approach uses a recently published binary B-O phase diagram. This combustion reactions are altered when boron is doped with iron, which is proposed to serve as a catalyst for boron oxidation.",
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Boron doped with iron : Preparation and combustion in air. / Chintersingh, Kerri Lee; Schoenitz, Mirko; Dreyzin, Edward.

In: Combustion and Flame, 01.02.2019, p. 286-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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