Bracing for scoliosis

Robert Heary, Sanjeev Kumar, Christopher M. Bono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BRACING IS THE oldest treatment known for scoliotic spinal deformity. The relative advantages to the use of bracing have been directly related to the etiology of the deformity and the flexibility of the spine at the time that a decision is made regarding the use of a brace. In skeletally immature patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the advantages to bracing are clear. In many instances, prompt recognition and appropriate bracing can arrest the progression of this form of deformity, and, in so doing, the need for any surgery may be avoided completely. On the other hand, in skeletally mature adult deformity patients, bracing has almost no proven role in affecting the natural history of the disease. Likewise, infantile and congenital scoliosis routinely requires surgical correction to prevent curve progression. Lastly, although many surgeons use bracing in the postoperative management of patients with spinal deformity, the benefits of postoperative bracing remain debatable. By far, the best indication for bracing is treatment of the skeletally immature adolescent patient with an idiopathic flexible curve of less than 45 degrees magnitude.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurosurgery
Volume63
Issue number3 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

Fingerprint

Scoliosis
Braces
Spine
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Keywords

  • Fusion
  • Iatrogenic
  • Outcomes
  • Postoperative
  • Scoliosis
  • Spine

Cite this

Heary, Robert ; Kumar, Sanjeev ; Bono, Christopher M. / Bracing for scoliosis. In: Neurosurgery. 2008 ; Vol. 63, No. 3 SUPPL.
@article{f24672e4a0d54f9085384f4fe84660ad,
title = "Bracing for scoliosis",
abstract = "BRACING IS THE oldest treatment known for scoliotic spinal deformity. The relative advantages to the use of bracing have been directly related to the etiology of the deformity and the flexibility of the spine at the time that a decision is made regarding the use of a brace. In skeletally immature patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the advantages to bracing are clear. In many instances, prompt recognition and appropriate bracing can arrest the progression of this form of deformity, and, in so doing, the need for any surgery may be avoided completely. On the other hand, in skeletally mature adult deformity patients, bracing has almost no proven role in affecting the natural history of the disease. Likewise, infantile and congenital scoliosis routinely requires surgical correction to prevent curve progression. Lastly, although many surgeons use bracing in the postoperative management of patients with spinal deformity, the benefits of postoperative bracing remain debatable. By far, the best indication for bracing is treatment of the skeletally immature adolescent patient with an idiopathic flexible curve of less than 45 degrees magnitude.",
keywords = "Fusion, Iatrogenic, Outcomes, Postoperative, Scoliosis, Spine",
author = "Robert Heary and Sanjeev Kumar and Bono, {Christopher M.}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1227/01.NEU.0000320387.93907.97",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
journal = "Neurosurgery",
issn = "0148-396X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3 SUPPL.",

}

Bracing for scoliosis. / Heary, Robert; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bono, Christopher M.

In: Neurosurgery, Vol. 63, No. 3 SUPPL., 01.09.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bracing for scoliosis

AU - Heary, Robert

AU - Kumar, Sanjeev

AU - Bono, Christopher M.

PY - 2008/9/1

Y1 - 2008/9/1

N2 - BRACING IS THE oldest treatment known for scoliotic spinal deformity. The relative advantages to the use of bracing have been directly related to the etiology of the deformity and the flexibility of the spine at the time that a decision is made regarding the use of a brace. In skeletally immature patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the advantages to bracing are clear. In many instances, prompt recognition and appropriate bracing can arrest the progression of this form of deformity, and, in so doing, the need for any surgery may be avoided completely. On the other hand, in skeletally mature adult deformity patients, bracing has almost no proven role in affecting the natural history of the disease. Likewise, infantile and congenital scoliosis routinely requires surgical correction to prevent curve progression. Lastly, although many surgeons use bracing in the postoperative management of patients with spinal deformity, the benefits of postoperative bracing remain debatable. By far, the best indication for bracing is treatment of the skeletally immature adolescent patient with an idiopathic flexible curve of less than 45 degrees magnitude.

AB - BRACING IS THE oldest treatment known for scoliotic spinal deformity. The relative advantages to the use of bracing have been directly related to the etiology of the deformity and the flexibility of the spine at the time that a decision is made regarding the use of a brace. In skeletally immature patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the advantages to bracing are clear. In many instances, prompt recognition and appropriate bracing can arrest the progression of this form of deformity, and, in so doing, the need for any surgery may be avoided completely. On the other hand, in skeletally mature adult deformity patients, bracing has almost no proven role in affecting the natural history of the disease. Likewise, infantile and congenital scoliosis routinely requires surgical correction to prevent curve progression. Lastly, although many surgeons use bracing in the postoperative management of patients with spinal deformity, the benefits of postoperative bracing remain debatable. By far, the best indication for bracing is treatment of the skeletally immature adolescent patient with an idiopathic flexible curve of less than 45 degrees magnitude.

KW - Fusion

KW - Iatrogenic

KW - Outcomes

KW - Postoperative

KW - Scoliosis

KW - Spine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=65849340194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=65849340194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.1227/01.NEU.0000320387.93907.97

DO - https://doi.org/10.1227/01.NEU.0000320387.93907.97

M3 - Article

C2 - 18812914

VL - 63

JO - Neurosurgery

JF - Neurosurgery

SN - 0148-396X

IS - 3 SUPPL.

ER -