Brief Report: Randomized Controlled Trial of an Intervention to Match Young Black Men and Transwomen Who Have Sex With Men or Transwomen to HIV Testing Options in New York City (All About Me)

Victoria Frye, Vijay Nandi, Sabina Hirshfield, Mary Ann Chiasson, Leo Wilton, Da Shawn Usher, Donald R. Hoover, Beryl A. Koblin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: HIV testing is critical to HIV prevention and care. Infrequent HIV testing and late HIV diagnosis have been observed among young Black men who have sex with men and transwomen. Novel interventions to increase HIV testing rates among young Black men who have sex with men and transwomen are needed. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial among 236 young Black men and transwomen who have sex with men or transwomen evaluated the efficacy of an intervention that included completion of a brief survey and receipt of a personalized recommendation of an optimal HIV testing approach. Participants completed a computerized baseline assessment and were randomized to electronically receive either a personalized recommendation or standard HIV testing information. Follow-up surveys were conducted online at 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Retention was 92% and 93% at 3-month and 6-month follow-up, respectively. At baseline, 41% of participants reported that they tested for HIV in the past 3 months and another 25% between 4 and 6 months ago. Intent-to-treat analyses found that participants randomized to the experimental arm (personalized recommendation) were not significantly more likely to test for HIV compared with participants in the standard HIV testing information control arm at 3 months (76% vs. 71%; P = 0.40) and 6 months (73% vs. 72%; P = 0.81), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study evaluated an innovative intervention to increase HIV testing by matching individuals to optimal HIV testing approaches. Participants in both arms increased past 3-month HIV testing, suggesting that providing information on options and/or raising risk awareness is sufficient to significantly increase HIV testing. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02834572 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02834572.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-36
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

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Randomized Controlled Trials
HIV
Delayed Diagnosis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Brief Report: Randomized Controlled Trial of an Intervention to Match Young Black Men and Transwomen Who Have Sex With Men or Transwomen to HIV Testing Options in New York City (All About Me)",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: HIV testing is critical to HIV prevention and care. Infrequent HIV testing and late HIV diagnosis have been observed among young Black men who have sex with men and transwomen. Novel interventions to increase HIV testing rates among young Black men who have sex with men and transwomen are needed. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial among 236 young Black men and transwomen who have sex with men or transwomen evaluated the efficacy of an intervention that included completion of a brief survey and receipt of a personalized recommendation of an optimal HIV testing approach. Participants completed a computerized baseline assessment and were randomized to electronically receive either a personalized recommendation or standard HIV testing information. Follow-up surveys were conducted online at 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Retention was 92{\%} and 93{\%} at 3-month and 6-month follow-up, respectively. At baseline, 41{\%} of participants reported that they tested for HIV in the past 3 months and another 25{\%} between 4 and 6 months ago. Intent-to-treat analyses found that participants randomized to the experimental arm (personalized recommendation) were not significantly more likely to test for HIV compared with participants in the standard HIV testing information control arm at 3 months (76{\%} vs. 71{\%}; P = 0.40) and 6 months (73{\%} vs. 72{\%}; P = 0.81), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study evaluated an innovative intervention to increase HIV testing by matching individuals to optimal HIV testing approaches. Participants in both arms increased past 3-month HIV testing, suggesting that providing information on options and/or raising risk awareness is sufficient to significantly increase HIV testing. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02834572 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02834572.",
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Brief Report : Randomized Controlled Trial of an Intervention to Match Young Black Men and Transwomen Who Have Sex With Men or Transwomen to HIV Testing Options in New York City (All About Me). / Frye, Victoria; Nandi, Vijay; Hirshfield, Sabina; Chiasson, Mary Ann; Wilton, Leo; Usher, Da Shawn; Hoover, Donald R.; Koblin, Beryl A.

In: Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999), Vol. 83, No. 1, 01.01.2020, p. 31-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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