Brief Report: Smoking in Systemic Sclerosis: A Longitudinal European Scleroderma Trials and Research Group Study

EUSTAR coauthors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Data on the role of tobacco exposure in systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) severity and progression are scarce. We aimed to assess the effects of smoking on the evolution of pulmonary and skin manifestations, based on the European Scleroderma Trials and Research group database. Methods: Adult SSc patients with data on smoking history and a 12–24-month follow-up visit were included. Associations of severity and progression of organ involvement with smoking history and the Comprehensive Smoking Index were assessed using multivariable regression analyses. Results: A total of 3,319 patients were included (mean age 57 years, 85% female); 66% were never smokers, 23% were ex-smokers, and 11% were current smokers. Current smokers had a lower percentage of antitopoisomerase autoantibodies than previous or never smokers (31% versus 40% and 45%, respectively). Never smokers had a higher baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio than previous and current smokers (P < 0.001). The FEV1/FVC ratio declined faster in current smokers than in never smokers (P = 0.05) or ex-smokers (P = 0.01). The baseline modified Rodnan skin thickness score (MRSS) and the MRSS decline were comparable across smoking groups. Although heavy smoking (>25 pack-years) increased the odds of digital ulcers by almost 50%, there was no robust adverse association of smoking with digital ulcer development. Conclusion: The known adverse effect of smoking on bronchial airways and alveoli is also observed in SSc patients; however, robust adverse effects of smoking on the progression of SSc-specific pulmonary or cutaneous manifestations were not observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1829-1834
Number of pages6
JournalArthritis and Rheumatology
Volume70
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Systemic Scleroderma
Smoking
Research
Skin Manifestations
Ulcer
History
Lung
Vital Capacity
Forced Expiratory Volume
Autoantibodies
Tobacco
Regression Analysis
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

@article{cfc564f33b00475e862cb712cd78b035,
title = "Brief Report: Smoking in Systemic Sclerosis: A Longitudinal European Scleroderma Trials and Research Group Study",
abstract = "Objective: Data on the role of tobacco exposure in systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) severity and progression are scarce. We aimed to assess the effects of smoking on the evolution of pulmonary and skin manifestations, based on the European Scleroderma Trials and Research group database. Methods: Adult SSc patients with data on smoking history and a 12–24-month follow-up visit were included. Associations of severity and progression of organ involvement with smoking history and the Comprehensive Smoking Index were assessed using multivariable regression analyses. Results: A total of 3,319 patients were included (mean age 57 years, 85{\%} female); 66{\%} were never smokers, 23{\%} were ex-smokers, and 11{\%} were current smokers. Current smokers had a lower percentage of antitopoisomerase autoantibodies than previous or never smokers (31{\%} versus 40{\%} and 45{\%}, respectively). Never smokers had a higher baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio than previous and current smokers (P < 0.001). The FEV1/FVC ratio declined faster in current smokers than in never smokers (P = 0.05) or ex-smokers (P = 0.01). The baseline modified Rodnan skin thickness score (MRSS) and the MRSS decline were comparable across smoking groups. Although heavy smoking (>25 pack-years) increased the odds of digital ulcers by almost 50{\%}, there was no robust adverse association of smoking with digital ulcer development. Conclusion: The known adverse effect of smoking on bronchial airways and alveoli is also observed in SSc patients; however, robust adverse effects of smoking on the progression of SSc-specific pulmonary or cutaneous manifestations were not observed.",
author = "{EUSTAR coauthors} and Jaeger, {Veronika K.} and Gabriele Valentini and Eric Hachulla and Franco Cozzi and Oliver Distler and Paolo Air{\'o} and Laszlo Czirj{\'a}k and Yannick Allanore and Elise Siegert and Edoardo Rosato and Marco Matucci-Cerinic and Cristian Caimmi and J{\"o}rg Henes and Carreira, {Patricia E.} and Vanessa Smith and {del Galdo}, Francesco and Denton, {Christopher P.} and Susanne Ullman and {De Langhe}, Ellen and Valeria Riccieri and Alegre-Sancho, {Juan J.} and Simona Rednic and Ulf M{\"u}ller-Ladner and Walker, {Ulrich A.} and Ananieva, {Lidia P.} and Florenzo Iannone and Distler, {J{\"o}rg H.W.} and Eduardo Kerzberg and Bojana Stamenkovic and {Da Silva}, {Jos{\'e} Antonio Pereira} and Ivan Catellv{\'i} and Sule Yavuz and Kamal Solanki and Branimir Anic and Esthela Loyo and Tim Schmeiser and Ionescu, {Ruxandra Maria} and Peter Villiger and Cantatore, {Francesco Paolo} and {de la Pe{\~n}a Lefebvre}, {Paloma Garc{\'i}a} and Carina Mihai and {Farge Bancel}, Dominique and {Farge Bancel}, Dominique and {Farge Bancel}, Dominique and Pierluigi Meroni and Thierry Martin and Stefan Heitmann and Nicolas Hunzelmann and Fahrettin Oksel and Washington Bianchi",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.1002/art.40557",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "1829--1834",
journal = "Arthritis Care and Research",
issn = "2151-464X",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "11",

}

Brief Report : Smoking in Systemic Sclerosis: A Longitudinal European Scleroderma Trials and Research Group Study. / EUSTAR coauthors.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatology, Vol. 70, No. 11, 11.2018, p. 1829-1834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brief Report

T2 - Smoking in Systemic Sclerosis: A Longitudinal European Scleroderma Trials and Research Group Study

AU - EUSTAR coauthors

AU - Jaeger, Veronika K.

AU - Valentini, Gabriele

AU - Hachulla, Eric

AU - Cozzi, Franco

AU - Distler, Oliver

AU - Airó, Paolo

AU - Czirják, Laszlo

AU - Allanore, Yannick

AU - Siegert, Elise

AU - Rosato, Edoardo

AU - Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

AU - Caimmi, Cristian

AU - Henes, Jörg

AU - Carreira, Patricia E.

AU - Smith, Vanessa

AU - del Galdo, Francesco

AU - Denton, Christopher P.

AU - Ullman, Susanne

AU - De Langhe, Ellen

AU - Riccieri, Valeria

AU - Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.

AU - Rednic, Simona

AU - Müller-Ladner, Ulf

AU - Walker, Ulrich A.

AU - Ananieva, Lidia P.

AU - Iannone, Florenzo

AU - Distler, Jörg H.W.

AU - Kerzberg, Eduardo

AU - Stamenkovic, Bojana

AU - Da Silva, José Antonio Pereira

AU - Catellví, Ivan

AU - Yavuz, Sule

AU - Solanki, Kamal

AU - Anic, Branimir

AU - Loyo, Esthela

AU - Schmeiser, Tim

AU - Ionescu, Ruxandra Maria

AU - Villiger, Peter

AU - Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

AU - de la Peña Lefebvre, Paloma García

AU - Mihai, Carina

AU - Farge Bancel, Dominique

AU - Farge Bancel, Dominique

AU - Farge Bancel, Dominique

AU - Meroni, Pierluigi

AU - Martin, Thierry

AU - Heitmann, Stefan

AU - Hunzelmann, Nicolas

AU - Oksel, Fahrettin

AU - Bianchi, Washington

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - Objective: Data on the role of tobacco exposure in systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) severity and progression are scarce. We aimed to assess the effects of smoking on the evolution of pulmonary and skin manifestations, based on the European Scleroderma Trials and Research group database. Methods: Adult SSc patients with data on smoking history and a 12–24-month follow-up visit were included. Associations of severity and progression of organ involvement with smoking history and the Comprehensive Smoking Index were assessed using multivariable regression analyses. Results: A total of 3,319 patients were included (mean age 57 years, 85% female); 66% were never smokers, 23% were ex-smokers, and 11% were current smokers. Current smokers had a lower percentage of antitopoisomerase autoantibodies than previous or never smokers (31% versus 40% and 45%, respectively). Never smokers had a higher baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio than previous and current smokers (P < 0.001). The FEV1/FVC ratio declined faster in current smokers than in never smokers (P = 0.05) or ex-smokers (P = 0.01). The baseline modified Rodnan skin thickness score (MRSS) and the MRSS decline were comparable across smoking groups. Although heavy smoking (>25 pack-years) increased the odds of digital ulcers by almost 50%, there was no robust adverse association of smoking with digital ulcer development. Conclusion: The known adverse effect of smoking on bronchial airways and alveoli is also observed in SSc patients; however, robust adverse effects of smoking on the progression of SSc-specific pulmonary or cutaneous manifestations were not observed.

AB - Objective: Data on the role of tobacco exposure in systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) severity and progression are scarce. We aimed to assess the effects of smoking on the evolution of pulmonary and skin manifestations, based on the European Scleroderma Trials and Research group database. Methods: Adult SSc patients with data on smoking history and a 12–24-month follow-up visit were included. Associations of severity and progression of organ involvement with smoking history and the Comprehensive Smoking Index were assessed using multivariable regression analyses. Results: A total of 3,319 patients were included (mean age 57 years, 85% female); 66% were never smokers, 23% were ex-smokers, and 11% were current smokers. Current smokers had a lower percentage of antitopoisomerase autoantibodies than previous or never smokers (31% versus 40% and 45%, respectively). Never smokers had a higher baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio than previous and current smokers (P < 0.001). The FEV1/FVC ratio declined faster in current smokers than in never smokers (P = 0.05) or ex-smokers (P = 0.01). The baseline modified Rodnan skin thickness score (MRSS) and the MRSS decline were comparable across smoking groups. Although heavy smoking (>25 pack-years) increased the odds of digital ulcers by almost 50%, there was no robust adverse association of smoking with digital ulcer development. Conclusion: The known adverse effect of smoking on bronchial airways and alveoli is also observed in SSc patients; however, robust adverse effects of smoking on the progression of SSc-specific pulmonary or cutaneous manifestations were not observed.

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U2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/art.40557

DO - https://doi.org/10.1002/art.40557

M3 - Article

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JO - Arthritis Care and Research

JF - Arthritis Care and Research

SN - 2151-464X

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