Choosing Discourse Outcome Measures to Assess Clinical Change

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Surveys of speech-language pathologists who work with people with aphasia indicate that they view the large number of existing measures to be a barrier to using discourse analysis in their practice. This article provides a process that can help determine whether a particular discourse outcome measure might be useful with a particular client. The process involves answering questions about the client, the treatment, the work setting, and the psychometric properties of the discourse outcome measure in question. By following this systematic process, clinicians can eliminate outcome measures that are not likely to provide useful data and can focus on those that can help them demonstrate treatment-related change.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalSeminars in Speech and Language
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 23 2020

Fingerprint

Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Aphasia
Psychometrics
Language
Therapeutics
Pathologists
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

Keywords

  • aphasia
  • discourse
  • outcomes

Cite this

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Choosing Discourse Outcome Measures to Assess Clinical Change. / Boyle, Mary.

In: Seminars in Speech and Language, Vol. 41, No. 1, 23.01.2020, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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