Cohesive strength of dry powders using rheology

Nicholas Ku, Sara Reynaud, Richard Haber, Chuck Rohn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In many industries, powders are a vital step in the processing toward manufacturing the final product. A challenge arises in the ability to predict the transport properties of these powders. Poor powder flowabilty results in difficulties in processing steps such as mixing. The solution is the development of a test to simulate the flow behavior of dry powders. Powder flowabilty is controlled by interparticle cohesion. Particle size, shape, and bulk density will all affect the flowabilty of the powder. The use of a rheometer allows for the collection of viscoelastic data of the cohesive powders. From this data, cohesion is predicted by determining the shear strength of the powder. In this study, talc, kaolin clay, and alumina powders were measured, due to their importance to cordierite processing. A method was developed to allow for the measurement of the shear stress of a powder while having precise control over the axial load present. The cohesive energy densities (CED), a measure of flowabilty, of the three powders were measured at two axial loads: 20kPa and 40kPa. The results show talc having the highest CED, followed by kaolin clay, with alumina showing the lowest value.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - A Collection of Papers Presented at the 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11
Pages237-243
Number of pages7
Volume32
Edition2
StatePublished - Nov 7 2011
EventMechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11 - Daytona Beach, FL, United States
Duration: Jan 23 2011Jan 28 2011

Other

OtherMechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11
CountryUnited States
CityDaytona Beach, FL
Period1/23/111/28/11

Fingerprint

Rheology
Powders
Talc
Kaolin
Aluminum Oxide
Axial loads
Clay
Alumina
Processing
Rheometers
Shear strength
Transport properties
Shear stress
Particle size

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Ku, N., Reynaud, S., Haber, R., & Rohn, C. (2011). Cohesive strength of dry powders using rheology. In Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - A Collection of Papers Presented at the 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11 (2 ed., Vol. 32, pp. 237-243)
Ku, Nicholas ; Reynaud, Sara ; Haber, Richard ; Rohn, Chuck. / Cohesive strength of dry powders using rheology. Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - A Collection of Papers Presented at the 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11. Vol. 32 2. ed. 2011. pp. 237-243
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Ku, N, Reynaud, S, Haber, R & Rohn, C 2011, Cohesive strength of dry powders using rheology. in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - A Collection of Papers Presented at the 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11. 2 edn, vol. 32, pp. 237-243, Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11, Daytona Beach, FL, United States, 1/23/11.

Cohesive strength of dry powders using rheology. / Ku, Nicholas; Reynaud, Sara; Haber, Richard; Rohn, Chuck.

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - A Collection of Papers Presented at the 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11. Vol. 32 2. ed. 2011. p. 237-243.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Ku N, Reynaud S, Haber R, Rohn C. Cohesive strength of dry powders using rheology. In Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics and Composites VI - A Collection of Papers Presented at the 35th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites, ICACC'11. 2 ed. Vol. 32. 2011. p. 237-243