Controlled exposure to diesel exhaust causes increased nitrite in exhaled breath condensate among subjects with asthma

Sabiha Hussain, Robert Laumbach, Jakemia Coleman, Hatim Youssef, Kathie Kelly-Mcneil, Pamela Ohman-Strickland, Junfeng Zhang, Howard Kipen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: To determine whether oxidative/nitrosative stress plays a role in the acute effects of diesel exhaust (DE) on subjects with asthma. METHODS:: In this crossover study, 16 subjects with mild to moderate asthma were exposed to clean filtered air or diluted DE (300 μg/m as PM2.5) for 1 hour with intermittent exercise. RESULTS:: Airway hyperreactivity increased 24 hours after exposure to DE compared with clean filtered air (PC20, 14.9 mg/mL vs 19.7 mg/mL; P = 0.012). Nitrite in exhaled breath condensate was elevated immediately after diesel exposure (P = 0.052) and remained elevated 4 and 24 hours after exposure. CONCLUSIONS:: After exposure to DE, subjects with asthma demonstrated increased airway hyperreactivity and obstruction. Increased nitrite in exhaled breath condensate, in the absence of increased exhaled nitric oxide, suggests a noninflammatory oxidative stress mechanism by which DE affects the lung.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1186-1191
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume54
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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