CORPORATE CHAMPIONS of EARLY-STAGE PROJECT PROPOSALS and the INSTITUTIONALISATION of ORGANISATIONAL INERTIA

Heidi M.J. Bertels, Murad Mithani, Siwei Zhu, Peter Koen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study looks at the role of champions in the early stages of the product development process, when employees try to secure initial funding for project proposals. Project proposals that fail to receive funding never become part of the firm's project pipeline; hence, it is critical to understand the champion's role early on. Existing research on corporate champions is mostly focused on the later stages of the new product development process and has generally identified corporate champions as key to projects likely to face organisational resistance. However, several recent studies suggest that champions may prefer projects less likely to face organisational resistance. Using data from project proposals of executive MBA students across 78 large organisations, we find that champion support for the team is weaker for project proposals likely to evoke resistance and that such lower champion support further reduces the likelihood of high-resistance early-stage proposals to receive initial funding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Innovation Management
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Product development
Pipelines
Personnel
Students
Champions
Funding

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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abstract = "This study looks at the role of champions in the early stages of the product development process, when employees try to secure initial funding for project proposals. Project proposals that fail to receive funding never become part of the firm's project pipeline; hence, it is critical to understand the champion's role early on. Existing research on corporate champions is mostly focused on the later stages of the new product development process and has generally identified corporate champions as key to projects likely to face organisational resistance. However, several recent studies suggest that champions may prefer projects less likely to face organisational resistance. Using data from project proposals of executive MBA students across 78 large organisations, we find that champion support for the team is weaker for project proposals likely to evoke resistance and that such lower champion support further reduces the likelihood of high-resistance early-stage proposals to receive initial funding.",
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