COVID-19 and friendships: Agreeableness and neuroticism are associated with more concern about COVID-19 and friends' risky behaviors

Jessica D. Ayers, Diego Guevara Beltrán, Andrew Van Horn, Lee Cronk, Hector Hurmuz-Sklias, Peter M. Todd, Athena Aktipis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Given the importance of friendships during challenging times and the mixed associations between personality traits and disease-related behaviors, we investigated the correlations between personality traits and perceptions of friendships during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected as part of a longitudinal investigation of the correlations between the pandemic and various cooperative relationships. In this investigation, we found that agreeableness and neuroticism predicted participants being more concerned about COVID-19 and bothered by friends' risky behavior, and extraversion predicted enjoying helping friends during the pandemic. Our results suggest that personality differences are associated with how individuals cope with friends' risky behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number112297
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume213
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2023
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Psychology

Keywords

  • Cooperation
  • COVID-19
  • Friendship
  • Personality

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