Deliberative democracy in theory and practice

Connecticut's medicaid managed care council

Colleen M. Grogan, Michael Gusmano

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite calls for greater deliberation among citizens on public policy, we have little information about how existing deliberation is structured or how well it works. We examine Connecticut's effort to put public deliberation to work in Medicaid policy-making. Findings from our participant-observation study and in-person interviews with 100 participants in this process suggest some important qualifications to literature on public deliberation. Greater inclusion of diverse social groups from the target population is important, but this should not replace the inclusion of professional advocates since the latter are often more willing than citizen representatives to challenge policy experts on technical issues. Incorporating public deliberation into the process at an early stage is ideal, but deliberation during the later stages of policymaking (including during implementation) can still produce useful results. Finally, the style and purpose of deliberation can shape the range of topics on the agenda, so it is important to understand how the structure of a deliberative forum can affect the style and purpose of deliberation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-146
Number of pages21
JournalState Politics and Policy Quarterly
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

deliberative democracy
managed care
deliberation
inclusion
citizen
Medicaid
Managed Care
Deliberation
Deliberative Democracy
participant observation
qualification
public policy
expert
Public Deliberation
human being
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

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Deliberative democracy in theory and practice : Connecticut's medicaid managed care council. / Grogan, Colleen M.; Gusmano, Michael.

In: State Politics and Policy Quarterly, Vol. 5, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 126-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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