Determinants of Homeownership among Immigrants

Changes during the Great Recession and Beyond

Kusum Mundra, Ruth Uwaifo Oyelere

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we explore factors correlated with immigrant homeownership before and after the Great Recession. We focus solely on immigrants because of recent evidence that suggests homeownership rates declined less for immigrants than natives in the United States during the recession and onward. Specifically, we examine to what extent an immigrant's income, savings, length of stay in the destination country, citizenship status, and birthplace networks affected the probability of homeownership before the recession, and how these impacts on homeownership changed since the recession. We examine these questions using microdata for the years 2000-2012. Our results suggest that citizenship status, birthplace network, family size, savings, household income, and length of stay are significant for an immigrant's homeownership. In comparing the pre-recession period to the period afterward, we find that the impact of birthplace networks on homeownership probabilities doubled while the impact of savings slightly declined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Migration Review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

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recession
immigrant
determinants
savings
citizenship
family size
household income
Immigrants
Recession
income
evidence
Savings
Place of Birth
Length
Citizenship
Income

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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title = "Determinants of Homeownership among Immigrants: Changes during the Great Recession and Beyond",
abstract = "In this paper, we explore factors correlated with immigrant homeownership before and after the Great Recession. We focus solely on immigrants because of recent evidence that suggests homeownership rates declined less for immigrants than natives in the United States during the recession and onward. Specifically, we examine to what extent an immigrant's income, savings, length of stay in the destination country, citizenship status, and birthplace networks affected the probability of homeownership before the recession, and how these impacts on homeownership changed since the recession. We examine these questions using microdata for the years 2000-2012. Our results suggest that citizenship status, birthplace network, family size, savings, household income, and length of stay are significant for an immigrant's homeownership. In comparing the pre-recession period to the period afterward, we find that the impact of birthplace networks on homeownership probabilities doubled while the impact of savings slightly declined.",
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Determinants of Homeownership among Immigrants : Changes during the Great Recession and Beyond. / Mundra, Kusum; Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth.

In: International Migration Review, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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