Director gliding in a nematic liquid crystal layer

Quantitative comparison with experiments

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The interaction between nematic liquid crystals and polymer-coated substrates may lead to slow reorientation of the easy axis (so-called "director gliding") when a prolonged external field is applied. We consider the experimental evidence of zenithal gliding observed by Joly et al. [Phys. Rev. E 70, 050701 (2004)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.70.050701] and Buluy et al. [J. Soc. Inf. Disp. 14, 603 (2006)1071-092210.1889/1.2235686] as well as azimuthal gliding observed by S. Faetti and P. Marianelli [Liq. Cryst. 33, 327 (2006)LICRE60267-829210.1080/02678290500512227], and we present a simple, physically motivated model that captures the slow dynamics of gliding, both in the presence of an electric field and after the electric field is turned off. We make a quantitative comparison of our model results and the experimental data and conclude that our model explains the gliding evolution very well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number032704
JournalPhysical Review E
Volume97
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2018

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gliding
Nematic Liquid Crystal
liquid crystals
Electric Field
Experiment
External Field
Polymers
Substrate
Experimental Data
Model
electric fields
retraining
Interaction
polymers
interactions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Statistical and Nonlinear Physics
  • Statistics and Probability

Cite this

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title = "Director gliding in a nematic liquid crystal layer: Quantitative comparison with experiments",
abstract = "The interaction between nematic liquid crystals and polymer-coated substrates may lead to slow reorientation of the easy axis (so-called {"}director gliding{"}) when a prolonged external field is applied. We consider the experimental evidence of zenithal gliding observed by Joly et al. [Phys. Rev. E 70, 050701 (2004)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.70.050701] and Buluy et al. [J. Soc. Inf. Disp. 14, 603 (2006)1071-092210.1889/1.2235686] as well as azimuthal gliding observed by S. Faetti and P. Marianelli [Liq. Cryst. 33, 327 (2006)LICRE60267-829210.1080/02678290500512227], and we present a simple, physically motivated model that captures the slow dynamics of gliding, both in the presence of an electric field and after the electric field is turned off. We make a quantitative comparison of our model results and the experimental data and conclude that our model explains the gliding evolution very well.",
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Director gliding in a nematic liquid crystal layer : Quantitative comparison with experiments. / Mema, E.; Kondic, Lou; Cummings, Linda.

In: Physical Review E, Vol. 97, No. 3, 032704, 19.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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