Distinguishing feast-watching from cringe-watching: Planned, social, and attentive binge-watching predicts increased well-being and decreased regret

Matthew Pittman, Emil Steiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study seeks to add nuance to the definition of binge-watching by identifying the subtypes of the general practice that reflect viewer rituals, motives, and outcomes. The two subtypes are (1) the healthy practice of ‘feast-watching’ and (2) the unhealthy practice of ‘cringe-watching’. While binge-watching as a singular behavior has been associated with anxiety, depression, and loneliness, a survey (N = 800) finds that binge-watching which is solo, accidental, and distracted (cringe-watching) predicts increased regret and decreased well-being. However, binge-watching that is planned, social, and attentive (feast-watching) predicts positive outcomes. These subtypes add much needed organizational clarity to the discussion of binge-watching, which, due to its popularity, has grown into a catchall for extended video consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalConvergence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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