Does formal research training lead to academic success in otolaryngology?

Michael R. Bobian, Noor Shah, Peter F. Svider, Robert S. Hong, Mahdi A. Shkoukani, Adam J. Folbe, Jean Anderson Eloy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: To evaluate whether formalized research training is associated with higher researcher productivity, academic rank, and acquisition of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants within academic otolaryngology departments. Methods: Each of the 100 civilian otolaryngology program's departmental websites were analyzed to obtain a comprehensive list of faculty members credentials and characteristics, including academic rank, completion of a clinical fellowship, completion of a formal research fellowship, and attainment of a doctorate in philosophy (PhD) degree. We also recorded measures of scholarly impact and successful acquisition of NIH funding. Results: A total of 1,495 academic physicians were included in our study. Of these, 14.1% had formal research training. Bivariate associations showed that formal research training was associated with a greater h-index, increased probability of acquiring NIH funding, and higher academic rank. Using a linear regression model, we found that otolaryngologists possessing a PhD had an associated h-index of 1.8 points higher, and those who completed a formal research fellowship had an h-index of 1.6 points higher. A PhD degree or completion of a research fellowship was not associated with a higher academic rank; however, a higher h-index and previous acquisition of an NIH grant were associated with a higher academic rank. The attainment of NIH funding was three times more likely for those with a formal research fellowship and 8.6 times more likely for otolaryngologists with a PhD degree. Conclusion: Formalized research training is associated with academic success in otolaryngology. Such dedicated research training accompanies greater scholarly impact, acquisition of NIH funding, and a higher academic rank. Level of Evidence: NA Laryngoscope, 127:E15–E21, 2017.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E15-E21
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume127
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Keywords

  • Scholarly impact
  • academic advancement
  • academic promotion
  • research productivity

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