Effect of weed pollen on children's hospital admissions for asthma during the fall season

Wansoo Im, Dona Schneider

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors analyzed temporal variations in asthma hospital admissions for New Jersey children (0-14 years of age) over a 3-year period. Significant spikes in children's asthma hospital admissions occurred during late September and early October of each of the 3 years of the study. The authors report on an in-depth analysis of the fall peak periods, in an effort to determine whether there was an association between children's asthma hospital admissions and environmental variables. Hospital admission peaks occurred approximately 3 weeks after school started and before heating systems were turned on in New Jersey public schools. They also preceded the point at which schools begin to report increased absences that are due to infectious illnesses. An examination of environmental variables showed only weed pollen as a statistically significant predictor of children's asthma hospital admissions during the fall peaks (p < .001). The counseling of parents about children's exposure to pollen and possible ways to reduce such exposure should be part of the asthma management protocols for children living in high-pollen environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-265
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Environmental and Occupational Health
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

asthma
Pollen
weed
pollen
Asthma
Heating
hospital
effect
Counseling
temporal variation
Parents
heating
school

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Asthma
  • Children
  • Ozone
  • Pollen

Cite this

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Effect of weed pollen on children's hospital admissions for asthma during the fall season. / Im, Wansoo; Schneider, Dona.

In: Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health, Vol. 60, No. 5, 01.01.2005, p. 257-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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