Effects of concurrent snow and cloud cover on planetary albedo

D. Kaiser, A. Robock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of snow and cloud cover on planetary albedo are examined using observations from NOAA polar orbiting satellites. Reflected radiation was measured in the visible range (0.5 - 0.7 μm). Planetary albedos resulting from different cloud/snow cover conditions are compared using Northern Hemisphere snow cover maps, surface weather charts, satellite photos and data on land surface types. None of the cases studied show that concurrent cloud and snow cover produces significantly different planetary albedos than cloud cover alone. Cloud cover alone is found to yield higher planetary albedos than snow cover alone; the difference being greatest over forested areas. With and without snow cover present, clear-sky planetary albedos over farming and grazing lands (snow(0.45), no snow(0.15)) are found to be significantly higher than those over forested regions (snow(0.33), no snow(0.11)). Variations in satellite zenith angle are not found to produce significant effects in most cases studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-282
Number of pages4
JournalAdvances in Space Research
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

snow cover
cloud cover
Snow
albedo
snow
meteorological charts
Satellites
grasslands
reflected waves
zenith angle
zenith
Northern Hemisphere
clear sky
sky
effect
land surface
grazing
weather

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

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title = "Effects of concurrent snow and cloud cover on planetary albedo",
abstract = "The effects of snow and cloud cover on planetary albedo are examined using observations from NOAA polar orbiting satellites. Reflected radiation was measured in the visible range (0.5 - 0.7 μm). Planetary albedos resulting from different cloud/snow cover conditions are compared using Northern Hemisphere snow cover maps, surface weather charts, satellite photos and data on land surface types. None of the cases studied show that concurrent cloud and snow cover produces significantly different planetary albedos than cloud cover alone. Cloud cover alone is found to yield higher planetary albedos than snow cover alone; the difference being greatest over forested areas. With and without snow cover present, clear-sky planetary albedos over farming and grazing lands (snow(0.45), no snow(0.15)) are found to be significantly higher than those over forested regions (snow(0.33), no snow(0.11)). Variations in satellite zenith angle are not found to produce significant effects in most cases studied.",
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Effects of concurrent snow and cloud cover on planetary albedo. / Kaiser, D.; Robock, A.

In: Advances in Space Research, Vol. 5, No. 6, 1985, p. 279-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of concurrent snow and cloud cover on planetary albedo

AU - Kaiser, D.

AU - Robock, A.

PY - 1985

Y1 - 1985

N2 - The effects of snow and cloud cover on planetary albedo are examined using observations from NOAA polar orbiting satellites. Reflected radiation was measured in the visible range (0.5 - 0.7 μm). Planetary albedos resulting from different cloud/snow cover conditions are compared using Northern Hemisphere snow cover maps, surface weather charts, satellite photos and data on land surface types. None of the cases studied show that concurrent cloud and snow cover produces significantly different planetary albedos than cloud cover alone. Cloud cover alone is found to yield higher planetary albedos than snow cover alone; the difference being greatest over forested areas. With and without snow cover present, clear-sky planetary albedos over farming and grazing lands (snow(0.45), no snow(0.15)) are found to be significantly higher than those over forested regions (snow(0.33), no snow(0.11)). Variations in satellite zenith angle are not found to produce significant effects in most cases studied.

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