Engineered containment systems: Identification of dominant ecological processes for long-term performance assessment and monitoring

Brooke Traynham, James Clarke, Joanna Burger, Jody Waugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The infiltration of rainfall into contaminated soils and wastes provides the mechanism whereby hazardous chemical and radionuclide constituents of concern are leached and transported to underlying groundwater and potential human and ecological receptors. The application of engineered covers to reduce rainfall infiltration is an approach that is often selected for the remediation of contaminated sites. Evapotranspiration, or water-balance, cover designs have been shown to be effective ways of preventing infiltration in arid and semiarid climates. This particular design relies on evaporation and vegetative transpiration to reduce potential infiltration to acceptable levels. In this article, we identify and examine the dominant ecological processes that affect the performance of evapotranspiration cover designs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-103
Number of pages11
JournalRemediation
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Engineering

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