Evaluation of a phone intervention to promote mammography in a managed care plan

Nancy A. Davis, Jane Lewis, Barbara K. Rimer, Christopher M. Harvey, Jeffrey P. Koplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mammography was significantly more common among women who received the phone intervention (46%) than among those who did not (30%). The mammography rate in the intervention group is slightly higher than those found in a previous study, which used either a brief reminder letter (42%) or telephone counseling (29%). This study, unlike the previous study, used a scheduling component. The intervention was delivered by HMO scheduling staff, who reached nearly 70% of the intervention subjects they attempted to call in an average of 1.8 calls. Half the intervention subjects who were reached scheduled a mammogram, and 79% of these women subsequently obtained a mammogram. The intervention cost per additional mammogram obtained was $18. This includes the administrative cost only, and not the medical cost of mammography. There were no diagnoses of breast cancer among the 472 intervention subjects who obtained a mammogram. However, on the basis of the rate of diagnoses (21 to 34 per 10,000) estimated by Harris and Leininger, very few diagnoses (1.0 to 1.6) would be expected in a population of this size.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-249
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Managed Care Programs
Mammography
managed care
Costs and Cost Analysis
evaluation
Health Maintenance Organizations
Population Density
Telephone
Counseling
scheduling
Breast Neoplasms
costs
telephone
counseling
cancer
staff
Group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Davis, Nancy A. ; Lewis, Jane ; Rimer, Barbara K. ; Harvey, Christopher M. ; Koplan, Jeffrey P. / Evaluation of a phone intervention to promote mammography in a managed care plan. In: American Journal of Health Promotion. 1997 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 247-249.
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Evaluation of a phone intervention to promote mammography in a managed care plan. / Davis, Nancy A.; Lewis, Jane; Rimer, Barbara K.; Harvey, Christopher M.; Koplan, Jeffrey P.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.01.1997, p. 247-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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