Evaluation of the use of fiber optic sensors in identification of fresco fracturing patterns

Branko Glisic, Dorotea Sigurdardottir, David Paul Dobkin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Ageing of materials and extreme events tend to damage structures, and ancient historical monuments are particularly vulnerable due to their age and long-term exposure to adverse events and influences. As an example, the wall paintings (frescoes) from the seventeenth century BCE found at the archaeological site of Akrotiri (Santorini, Greece) were recovered from volcanic ash in fragments with dimensions ranging from a few centimeters to a few decimeters. Identification of the fracturing patterns is helpful to the process of piecing together the fragments of frescos. Previous work has involved looking at fracturing patterns in frescos that have been reassembled. Recent work has looked at the process by which fractures develop. Current identification techniques involve experimental study of fracture development on plaster molds using a high-speed camera combined with sophisticated algorithms for pattern recognition. However, the use of a high-speed camera is challenging due to very demanding data processing and analysis and some inaccuracies in identification of fracture initialization generated by light conditions. This paper aims to evaluate whether or not short-gauge fiber optic sensors (FOS) based on Fiber Brag-Gratings (FBG), can be used to help identify the fracturing patterns of falling frescoes as a complement to high-speed cameras. In total four tests were performed using surface and embedded sensors on various plaster molds. The data taken by sensors installed on the surface of the mold were more complex to analyze and interpret than the data taken by embedded sensors, since the former reflected combined influence from fracture and bending. While their practicality is challenged by cost, moderately dense arrays of embedded FOS are found to be a plausible complement to the high speed-camera in the experiments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015
EditorsHoon Sohn, Kon-Well Wang, Jerome P. Lynch
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781628415384
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
EventSensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015 - San Diego, United States
Duration: Mar 9 2015Mar 12 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume9435

Other

OtherSensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period3/9/153/12/15

Fingerprint

High-speed Camera
Fiber Optic Sensor
High speed cameras
fracturing
Fiber optic sensors
high speed cameras
fiber optics
Plaster
evaluation
sensors
plasters
Molds
Evaluation
Ashes
Sensor
Sensors
Fragment
Volcanic Eruptions
Complement
complement

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications

Keywords

  • Fiber Bragg-gratings
  • Fiber optic sensors
  • Fracture identification
  • Fresco fragments
  • High-speed camera

Cite this

Glisic, B., Sigurdardottir, D., & Dobkin, D. P. (2015). Evaluation of the use of fiber optic sensors in identification of fresco fracturing patterns. In H. Sohn, K-W. Wang, & J. P. Lynch (Eds.), Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015 [943521] (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 9435). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2087198
Glisic, Branko ; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea ; Dobkin, David Paul. / Evaluation of the use of fiber optic sensors in identification of fresco fracturing patterns. Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015. editor / Hoon Sohn ; Kon-Well Wang ; Jerome P. Lynch. SPIE, 2015. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).
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abstract = "Ageing of materials and extreme events tend to damage structures, and ancient historical monuments are particularly vulnerable due to their age and long-term exposure to adverse events and influences. As an example, the wall paintings (frescoes) from the seventeenth century BCE found at the archaeological site of Akrotiri (Santorini, Greece) were recovered from volcanic ash in fragments with dimensions ranging from a few centimeters to a few decimeters. Identification of the fracturing patterns is helpful to the process of piecing together the fragments of frescos. Previous work has involved looking at fracturing patterns in frescos that have been reassembled. Recent work has looked at the process by which fractures develop. Current identification techniques involve experimental study of fracture development on plaster molds using a high-speed camera combined with sophisticated algorithms for pattern recognition. However, the use of a high-speed camera is challenging due to very demanding data processing and analysis and some inaccuracies in identification of fracture initialization generated by light conditions. This paper aims to evaluate whether or not short-gauge fiber optic sensors (FOS) based on Fiber Brag-Gratings (FBG), can be used to help identify the fracturing patterns of falling frescoes as a complement to high-speed cameras. In total four tests were performed using surface and embedded sensors on various plaster molds. The data taken by sensors installed on the surface of the mold were more complex to analyze and interpret than the data taken by embedded sensors, since the former reflected combined influence from fracture and bending. While their practicality is challenged by cost, moderately dense arrays of embedded FOS are found to be a plausible complement to the high speed-camera in the experiments.",
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Glisic, B, Sigurdardottir, D & Dobkin, DP 2015, Evaluation of the use of fiber optic sensors in identification of fresco fracturing patterns. in H Sohn, K-W Wang & JP Lynch (eds), Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015., 943521, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 9435, SPIE, Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015, San Diego, United States, 3/9/15. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2087198

Evaluation of the use of fiber optic sensors in identification of fresco fracturing patterns. / Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Dobkin, David Paul.

Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015. ed. / Hoon Sohn; Kon-Well Wang; Jerome P. Lynch. SPIE, 2015. 943521 (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 9435).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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KW - Fiber Bragg-gratings

KW - Fiber optic sensors

KW - Fracture identification

KW - Fresco fragments

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Glisic B, Sigurdardottir D, Dobkin DP. Evaluation of the use of fiber optic sensors in identification of fresco fracturing patterns. In Sohn H, Wang K-W, Lynch JP, editors, Sensors and Smart Structures Technologies for Civil, Mechanical, and Aerospace Systems 2015. SPIE. 2015. 943521. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2087198