Fermi-liquid theory and divergences of the two-particle irreducible vertex in the periodic Anderson lattice

Corey Melnick, Gabriel Kotliar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Here we analyze the divergences of the irreducible vertex function in dynamical mean field theory, which may indicate either a nonphysical breakdown of the perturbation theory or a response to some physical phenomenon. To investigate this question, we construct a quasiparticle vertex from the diverging irreducible vertex functions. This vertex describes the scattering between quasiparticles and quasiholes in a Fermi liquid. We show that the quasparticle vertex does not diverge in the charge channel, wherein the irreducible vertex does diverge; and we show that the quasiparticle vertex does diverge in the spin channel, wherein the irreducible vertex does not diverge. This divergence occurs at the Mott transition, wherein the Fermi-liquid theory breaks down. Both the half filled Hubbard and Anderson lattices are investigated. In general, our results support that the divergences of the irreducible vertex function do not indicate a nonphysical failure of the perturbation theory. Instead, the divergences are the mathematical consequence of inverting a matrix (the local charge susceptibility) which accumulates increasingly negative diagonal elements as the Hubbard interaction suppresses charge fluctuations. Indeed, we find that the first divergences of the irreducible vertex in both Hubbard and Anderson lattices occurs near the maximum magnitude of the (negative) vertex-connected part of the charge susceptibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number165105
JournalPhysical Review B
Volume101
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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