Focusing on teacher-student interactions eliminates the negative impact of students disruptive behavior on teacher perceptions

Christopher A. Hafen, Erik A. Ruzek, Anne Gregory, Joseph P. Allen, Amori Yee Mikami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tests the impact of a randomly assigned professional development coaching intervention (MyTeachingPartner-Secondary; MTP-S) on teacher projections of their students educational attainment. Results indicate that students who report more behavior problems in the Fall of the academic year are projected by teachers to have lower future educational attainment in the Spring of the academic year. However, analyses further indicate that participation in the MTP-S intervention moderates the association between Fall student behavior problems and teachers Spring projections for student attainment, such that this link is not significant for students in classrooms where the teacher is participating in MTP-S. In fact, results indicate that teachers who participate in the intervention project better educational attainment for their students than teachers who are in a business-as-usual control condition, regardless of their students behavior. Findings are discussed in terms of the role that interventions targeting classroom interactions may play in altering teachers internal view of students, thus ultimately promoting adolescent development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-431
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Development
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 19 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Keywords

  • Adolescent development
  • behavior problems
  • high school
  • relationship quality
  • school environment
  • secondary school

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