"Good Girls": Gender, Social Class, and Slut Discourse on Campus

Elizabeth A. Armstrong, Laura T. Hamilton, Elizabeth M. Armstrong, J. Lotus Seeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Women's participation in slut shaming is often viewed as internalized oppression: they apply disadvantageous sexual double standards established by men. This perspective grants women little agency and neglects their simultaneous location in other social structures. In this article we synthesize insights from social psychology, gender, and culture to argue that undergraduate women use slut stigma to draw boundaries around status groups linked to social class-while also regulating sexual behavior and gender performance. High-status women employ slut discourse to assert class advantage, defining themselves as classy rather than trashy, while low-status women express class resentment-deriding rich, bitchy sluts for their exclusivity. Slut discourse enables, rather than constrains, sexual experimentation for the high-status women whose definitions prevail in the dominant social scene. This is a form of sexual privilege. In contrast, low-status women risk public shaming when they attempt to enter dominant social worlds.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)100-122
Number of pages23
JournalSocial Psychology Quarterly
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Keywords

  • class
  • college women
  • gender
  • identity
  • qualitative methods
  • reputation
  • sexuality
  • status
  • stigma
  • young adulthood

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