Growing Up and Going Abroad

How Ghanaian Children Imagine Transnational Migration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Migration scholars should give attention to migration as seen through children's eyes for at least two reasons. Firstly, children's perspectives help us to understand whether or not children are being socialised into their community's culture of migration, a culture which shapes migration patterns and flows. Secondly, given that some children migrate and some children are left behind by migrant parents or relatives, children's imaginings of whether they as children ought to migrate affect where the responsibility and costs for their care will be located between family members, countries and states. In this paper I examine how children aged 8-22 in a town in southern Ghana imagine life abroad, conceptualise the timing of migration in their life-course, and articulate their goals in migrating. I use this rich material as a case study for exploring the wider issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)913-931
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

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migration
Transnational Migration
Ghana
family member
parents
migrant
town
responsibility
costs
community

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Growing Up and Going Abroad : How Ghanaian Children Imagine Transnational Migration. / Coe, Cathleen.

In: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 38, No. 6, 01.07.2012, p. 913-931.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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