Growth and physiological factors involved in interspecific variations in drought tolerance and postdrought recovery in warm- and cool-season turfgrass species

Jingjin Yu, Mengxian Liu, Zhimin Yang, Bingru Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Drought stress is one of the most important abiotic stresses limiting plant growth, while high recuperative capacity of plants from drought damages is critical for plant survival in periods of drought stress and rewatering. The objective of our study was to determine physiological and growth factors in association with drought tolerance and recuperative capacity of cool-season kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis cv. Excursion II) and warm-season zoysigrass (Zoysia matrella cv. Diomand), which were grown in controlled environment chambers and maintained well watered (control) or subjected to drought stress and subsequently rewatering. Compared with kentucky bluegrass, zoysiagrass maintained higher leaf hydration level during drought stress, as shown by greater relative water content (RWC), improved osmotic adjustment (OA), increased leaf thickness, and more extensive root system at deeper soil layers. Turf quality (TQ) and photosynthesis recovered to a greater level and sooner in response to rewatering for zoysiagrass, compared with kentucky bluegrass, which could be due to more rapid reopening of stomata [higher stomatal conductance (gS)] and leaf rehydration (higher RWC). The aforementioned physiological factors associated with leaf dehydration tolerance during drought and rapid resumption in turf growth and photosynthesis in zoysiagrass could be useful traits for improving drought tolerance in turfgrasses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-465
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
Volume140
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Horticulture
  • Genetics

Keywords

  • Kentucky bluegrass
  • Rewatering
  • Water stress
  • Zoysiagrass

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