Hydroepithelial keratectomy in rabbits with a waterjet-based instrument

Barbara Parolini, Parid Turdiu, Marc Abelson, Marco Zarbin, Eugene Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Corneal epithelial removal finds multiple applications in ophthalmic surgery (epithelial herpes infections, recurrent epithelial erosion, corneal ulcers and plaques, and intraoperative epithelial clouding). Photorefractive keratectomy is initiated by removal of the epithelium. Current techniques for epithelial removal are suboptimal. We studied the safety and effectiveness of a new technique, hydroepithelial keratectomy, performed with the HydroBrush keratome on live rabbits. METHODS: Eighteen rabbits (18 eyes) underwent hydroepithelial keratectomy and 18 rabbits (18 eyes) underwent epithelial removal with a surgical blade (blade group). Twelve rabbits were euthanized immediately after the procedure. Twenty-four rabbis werre followed for up to 120 hours after treatment. Ultrastructural analysis was performed with light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: The hydroepithelial keratectomy group healed a mean 53 hours after treatment; the blade group healed a mean 78 hours after treatment. The HydroBrush keratome exposed the basement membrane and the basal cell membrane of the epithelium. The blade exposed patches of basement membrane, as well as stroma and cell debris. CONCLUSIONS: Hydroepithelial keratectomy with the HydroBrush keratome is effective and safe. Wound healing after hydroepithelial keratectomy is faster than after blade removal. Unlike the blade, the HydroBrush keratome exposed a smooth surface, devoid of debris, with well-defined edges and round shape without hydration nor dehydration of the tissue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-356
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Refractive Surgery
Volume14
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1 1998

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Rabbits
Basement Membrane
Epithelium
Clergy
Photorefractive Keratectomy
Corneal Ulcer
Dehydration
Wound Healing
Electron Microscopy
Therapeutics
Cell Membrane
Safety
Light
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Parolini, B., Turdiu, P., Abelson, M., Zarbin, M., & Gordon, E. (1998). Hydroepithelial keratectomy in rabbits with a waterjet-based instrument. Journal of Refractive Surgery, 14(3), 346-356.
Parolini, Barbara ; Turdiu, Parid ; Abelson, Marc ; Zarbin, Marco ; Gordon, Eugene. / Hydroepithelial keratectomy in rabbits with a waterjet-based instrument. In: Journal of Refractive Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 346-356.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Corneal epithelial removal finds multiple applications in ophthalmic surgery (epithelial herpes infections, recurrent epithelial erosion, corneal ulcers and plaques, and intraoperative epithelial clouding). Photorefractive keratectomy is initiated by removal of the epithelium. Current techniques for epithelial removal are suboptimal. We studied the safety and effectiveness of a new technique, hydroepithelial keratectomy, performed with the HydroBrush keratome on live rabbits. METHODS: Eighteen rabbits (18 eyes) underwent hydroepithelial keratectomy and 18 rabbits (18 eyes) underwent epithelial removal with a surgical blade (blade group). Twelve rabbits were euthanized immediately after the procedure. Twenty-four rabbis werre followed for up to 120 hours after treatment. Ultrastructural analysis was performed with light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: The hydroepithelial keratectomy group healed a mean 53 hours after treatment; the blade group healed a mean 78 hours after treatment. The HydroBrush keratome exposed the basement membrane and the basal cell membrane of the epithelium. The blade exposed patches of basement membrane, as well as stroma and cell debris. CONCLUSIONS: Hydroepithelial keratectomy with the HydroBrush keratome is effective and safe. Wound healing after hydroepithelial keratectomy is faster than after blade removal. Unlike the blade, the HydroBrush keratome exposed a smooth surface, devoid of debris, with well-defined edges and round shape without hydration nor dehydration of the tissue.",
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Parolini, B, Turdiu, P, Abelson, M, Zarbin, M & Gordon, E 1998, 'Hydroepithelial keratectomy in rabbits with a waterjet-based instrument', Journal of Refractive Surgery, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 346-356.

Hydroepithelial keratectomy in rabbits with a waterjet-based instrument. / Parolini, Barbara; Turdiu, Parid; Abelson, Marc; Zarbin, Marco; Gordon, Eugene.

In: Journal of Refractive Surgery, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.05.1998, p. 346-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Corneal epithelial removal finds multiple applications in ophthalmic surgery (epithelial herpes infections, recurrent epithelial erosion, corneal ulcers and plaques, and intraoperative epithelial clouding). Photorefractive keratectomy is initiated by removal of the epithelium. Current techniques for epithelial removal are suboptimal. We studied the safety and effectiveness of a new technique, hydroepithelial keratectomy, performed with the HydroBrush keratome on live rabbits. METHODS: Eighteen rabbits (18 eyes) underwent hydroepithelial keratectomy and 18 rabbits (18 eyes) underwent epithelial removal with a surgical blade (blade group). Twelve rabbits were euthanized immediately after the procedure. Twenty-four rabbis werre followed for up to 120 hours after treatment. Ultrastructural analysis was performed with light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: The hydroepithelial keratectomy group healed a mean 53 hours after treatment; the blade group healed a mean 78 hours after treatment. The HydroBrush keratome exposed the basement membrane and the basal cell membrane of the epithelium. The blade exposed patches of basement membrane, as well as stroma and cell debris. CONCLUSIONS: Hydroepithelial keratectomy with the HydroBrush keratome is effective and safe. Wound healing after hydroepithelial keratectomy is faster than after blade removal. Unlike the blade, the HydroBrush keratome exposed a smooth surface, devoid of debris, with well-defined edges and round shape without hydration nor dehydration of the tissue.

AB - BACKGROUND: Corneal epithelial removal finds multiple applications in ophthalmic surgery (epithelial herpes infections, recurrent epithelial erosion, corneal ulcers and plaques, and intraoperative epithelial clouding). Photorefractive keratectomy is initiated by removal of the epithelium. Current techniques for epithelial removal are suboptimal. We studied the safety and effectiveness of a new technique, hydroepithelial keratectomy, performed with the HydroBrush keratome on live rabbits. METHODS: Eighteen rabbits (18 eyes) underwent hydroepithelial keratectomy and 18 rabbits (18 eyes) underwent epithelial removal with a surgical blade (blade group). Twelve rabbits were euthanized immediately after the procedure. Twenty-four rabbis werre followed for up to 120 hours after treatment. Ultrastructural analysis was performed with light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: The hydroepithelial keratectomy group healed a mean 53 hours after treatment; the blade group healed a mean 78 hours after treatment. The HydroBrush keratome exposed the basement membrane and the basal cell membrane of the epithelium. The blade exposed patches of basement membrane, as well as stroma and cell debris. CONCLUSIONS: Hydroepithelial keratectomy with the HydroBrush keratome is effective and safe. Wound healing after hydroepithelial keratectomy is faster than after blade removal. Unlike the blade, the HydroBrush keratome exposed a smooth surface, devoid of debris, with well-defined edges and round shape without hydration nor dehydration of the tissue.

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