Investigating the biological impacts of radio transmissions: Poster abstract

Murtadha Aldeer, Joseph Florentine, Justin Yu, Liam Ryan, Zhenzhou Qi, Jakub Kolodziejski, Mike Haberland, Richard E. Howard, Richard P. Martin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The past 40 years have seen an explosion of Radio Frequency (RF) transmitters, which motivates understanding their impacts on the natural world. The European honeybee, Apis Mellifera, has been shown to sense the Earth's magnetic field. Human Radio Frequency (RF) transmitters alter this field. For example, recent work demonstrated that human-created RF interferes with the common robin's ability to orient themselves. This work proposes an experimental design to determine if honeybees can sense RF transmissions in frequencies from 1 MHz (AM radio) to 6 GHz (WiFi). We deployed a custom-designed RF bee feeder near bee hives to test honeybees' RF sensing ability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSenSys 2020 - Proceedings of the 2020 18th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages695-696
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9781450375900
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2020
Event18th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2020 - Virtual, Online, Japan
Duration: Nov 16 2020Nov 19 2020

Publication series

NameSenSys 2020 - Proceedings of the 2020 18th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems

Conference

Conference18th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2020
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityVirtual, Online
Period11/16/2011/19/20

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Keywords

  • RF
  • bee feeder
  • biological impacts
  • honeybee
  • sensing

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